2016 Manitoba

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Climate Change

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on April 16, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Pledges to cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the province by 1/3 within the next 15 years. (1)

  • Supports efforts to establish a national carbon pricing regime. (2)

  • Signed Manitoba onto a shared cap-and-trade carbon market with Ontario, Quebec, and several U.S. states in 2015. (2)

  • Pledges to increase geothermal and solar energy subsidies by an unspecified amount. (3)

  • Pledges to reduce interest rates on PowerSmart loans (a provincial low interest loan to make energy efficient upgrades to private homes) from 3.9% to 2.9% for individuals. (1, 3, 4)

  • Pledges to lower loan rates for small and commercial businesses interested in improving their buildings’ energy efficiency from 5.9% to 2.9%. (3)

  • Promises to create a program to retrofit Manitoba Housing properties and homes owned by low-income Manitobans to boost energy efficient and reduce utility bills for residents. (3)

  • Supports the current national review process for the Energy East pipeline and has taken no strong positions for or against it. (5)


  • Pledges to work with the federal government and create a national carbon-pricing regime. (6)

  • Promise to implement stricter building codes to put government operations and infrastructure onto a path of carbon neutrality. (6)

  • Pledges to develop a land-use and conservation plan to sequester carbon and foster greater adaptation to climate change. (6)

  • Pledges to increase energy efficiency programs in the province and to create an arms-length agency to improve Manitoba Hydro’s energy-efficiency programs. (6, 7)

  • Supports the current national review process for the Energy East pipeline and will wait until the end of the environmental review process before taking any firm position. (8)


  • Has not taken any firm positions in regards to carbon pricing. (8)

  • Pledges to introduce a rebate for people who buy fuel efficient cars to encourage a transition to lower fuel usage; the rebate would range from $2000 to $5000. (9)

  • Pledges to pass an anti-idling law for areas near schools, parks and hospitals in order to reduce GHG (Greenhouse Gas) emissions and reduce pollution in important communal areas. (10)

  • Has made no firm comments in regards to the Energy East pipeline.


  • Pledges to introduce a carbon tax that would add $50 dollar/tonne of carbon (between 11 and 13 cents per liter of gasoline), and use the funds generated to eliminate payroll taxes, build up green infrastructure, and improve energy efficiency within the province. This would replace the current cap-and-trade system introduced by the NDP. (11, 12, 13)

  • Promises to work towards making the province “carbon free.” (11, 13)

  • Promises funds for electric vehicle charging stations in public places across the province, and would provide grants to cover the cost of installing electric vehicle charging stations in homes and offices. (11)

  • Pledges to provide grants to expand geothermal, wind, and solar thermal heating and energy generation in the province. (11, 13)

  • Pledges to construct methane-capturing technologies at garbage dumps, commercial composters, waterless sanitation systems, and local recycling industries in order to reduce GHG emissions at these sites. (11)

  • Pledges to provide grants to finance energy audits for commercial buildings in First Nations communities, and will expand energy retrofit programs for residential, commercial and institutional buildings. (11)

  • Is committed to reducing agricultural emissions by subsidizing manure digesters on livestock operations. (11)

  • Pledges to make public transit free to increase its usages and reduce GHG emissions. (11)

  • Opposes the Energy East pipeline, and is the only party to clearly take this position. (8. 13)

References

  1. CBC
  2. Globe and Mail
  3. CBC
  4. Manitoba Hydro Website
  5. NDP Website
  6. Progressive Conservative Website
  7. Progressive Conservative Website
  8. CBC
  9. CBC
  10. Liberal Website
  11. Green Party Platform
  12. CBC
  13. CBC

Corporate Taxation

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on April 16, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Pledges to increase the small-business tax-free income threshold to $500,000 from $450,000 starting in 2017. (1, 9)

  • Eliminated the small business tax rate for businesses with income under $450,000 in 2010 (reducing it from 1%). (1, 9)


  • Pledges not to raise business or retail taxes without having Manitobans vote on any proposed increases, with a rule that would impose a mandatory pay cut of 20% for premiers and cabinet members if they increase taxes without a vote. (2, 3)

  • Is committed to improving the Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit, after consultations with the business community. (3)

  • Pledges to establish a ‘Red-Tape Reduction Force’ of business, labour, and community leaders to reduce red-tape hindering business growth. (3)


  • Pledges to phase out payroll taxes once the provincial budget is balanced, beginning with educational institutions. (4, 5)


  • Pledges to reduce the Health and Education Levy (a payroll tax) on small businesses. (6, 7)

  • Promises to increase the tax rate for large corporations [ from 12% to 15.9% to fund education in the province. (6)

  • Pledges to eliminate PST exemptions for farm pesticides, farm subsidies on gasoline, and other unspecified corporate income tax subsidies. (6)

References

  1. NDP Website
  2. CBC
  3. Progressive Conservative Platform
  4. Liberal Website
  5. Metro News
  6. Green Party Platform
  7. CBC
  8. CBC
  9. Manitoba Finance

Day Care and Child Care

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on April 14, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Pledges $25 million for 12,000 new, public and community-operated child care spaces, including 100 in the St. James neighbourhood. (1)

  • Promises to move most school-age spaces into schools to make child care even more convenient for parents, and to create more infant and preschool spaces in schools. (1)

  • Is committed to doubling employment opportunities and increasing wages for child care workers. (1)

  • Promises to invest $375,000 to promote healthy eating for young children by encouraging positive eating environments in child-care settings. (2)

  • Pledges $1000 grants for parent councils to offset child minding costs. (3)

  • Introduced a bill advocating Customary Care, which would allow children in Child and Family Services care to stay in their communities, but the bill failed to pass. (4)


  • Promises to simplify the process of opening home-based child care centres and increase funding for home-based child care spaces for: infants by 70%, preschool-aged children by 68%, and school-aged children by 15%. (5)

  • Pledges to increase incentives for Manitobans to train as Early Childhood Educators by providing more post-secondary scholarships and bursaries. (5)

  • Endeavours to build 550 new child care spaces this year, especially in schools, through social enterprise initiatives (including with the organization Family Dynamics) and public-private partnerships. (5, 6)

  • Is committed to reducing the number of children in Child and Family Services care by improving the economy. (7)


  • Pledges to increase spending on child care by $30 million, to be put toward new and rehabilitated spaces as well as increased training and salaries for child care workers. (8)

  • Promises to reduce number of children in Child and Family Services care in half by spending more money on working toward family supports than on apprehending children. (9)

  • Pledges to give children the option to remain in Child and Family Services care until age 25. (9)


  • Pledges to establish a universal provincially funded child care system. (10)

References

  1. Manitoba NDP website
  2. Manitoba NDP website
  3. Manitoba NDP website
  4. Manitoba NDP website
  5. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party website
  6. CBC
  7. CBC
  8. Manitoba Liberal Party platform
  9. Global News
  10. Green Party website

Flood Protection

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on April 14, 2016

The major flooding of 2011-2012 was the worst in Manitoba’s history. Because it undermined the province’s finances, it has made it extremely difficult for the province the balance the budget. One of the major proposals is to build a Lake Manitoba-Lake St. Martin outlet. However, this would run through the traditional lands of four First Nations whose concerns about previous flood control infrastructure have been neglected. The Federal government has committed $248 million towards the project.

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Promises $10 billion in new infrastructure spending by the end of 2022, some of which will be aimed at increasing flood protections, as well as fixing and building roads and bridges such as Highway 75 to make them more flood-resistant. (3, 5)

  • Launched extensive investigation into flood prevention; the final report recommends around $1 billion in options, though it has not been implemented. (1)

  • Pledges to work with First Nations communities to build flood outlets for Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. (5)

  • Pledges to increase flood protection in Brandon and has begun doing so. (1, 5)

  • Has stated that its PST increase from 7% to 8% was, in part, to help fund additional flood protections. (1, 2)


  • Pledges to prioritize and build an outlet to Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin, to be finished in the by the end of their first term in office – faster than any other party has committed to doing so. (1, 3, 4, 6)

  • Will implement a new watershed-based planning system to ensure there is no net loss of water-retention capacity in watersheds. (4)


  • Pledges to build a Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin outlet, but only after the budget is balanced (1, 7)


  • Pledges to alter the rules around farmland drainage, which leads to flooding. Would allow farmers to move ponds and wetlands for farming but require that the water be retained; would end all drainage subsidies; and would provide tax incentives for the replacement of natural water retention capacity. (8)

  • Plans to prohibit further wetland drainage on government-owned wetlands and ensure their protection. (8)

References

  1. Winnipeg Free Press
  2. CBC
  3. CTV Winnipeg
  4. Progressive Conservative Platform
  5. CBC
  6. CBC
  7. Liberal Website
  8. Green Party Platform

Infrastructure

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on April 16, 2016

This page does not include flood protection infrastructure. To compare the parties’ plans for flood protection, click here.

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Promises to invest $10 billion on infrastructure over a six-year period, which the party believes will boost the economy by $11.5 billion and increase exports by $9.6 billion. (1)

  • Its $10 billion investment plan includes $6.6 billion for provincial highways and bridges; $2.5 billion for municipal roads, clean water, and active transportation projects (e.g. biking); $900 million in flood protection; $100 million for active transportation projects; $250 million for Winnipeg roads; and increasing its share of funding for major projects to more than one-third. (1)

  • Promises to twin the Trans-Canada Highway east to Ontario and to raise speed limit to 110 km/h by 2022. (1)

  • Pledges to fast-track the construction of an inner ring road to move rail lines out of residential neighbourhoods and expand rapid transit. (2)

  • Has earmarked $125 million over five years to help build and renovate arenas, pools, parks, libraries and other facilities. (3)

  • Promises to continue funding 1/3rd of the cost of Handi-Transit projects to help Manitobans with limited mobility. (11)


  • Promises to invest at least $1 billion per year on infrastructure projects, and to make “return on investment” a criterion for choosing projects. (4, 5)

  • Pledges to make funding guaranteed so recipients can plan dependably. (5)

  • Is committed to working toward carbon neutrality by reducing carbon emissions on commercial buildings through building codes. (5)

  • Pledges to build an international curling centre to attract top-tier players and coaches. (5)

  • Promises to streamline provincial funding for municipal projects. (6)


  • Promises to divert 1% of the PST increase to a municipal infrastructure fund on a per capita basis. (6, 8)

  • Pledges to invest in “social infrastructure and cultural infrastructure” by diverting road funds toward an advisory council on the arts and for maintaining existing arts facilities. (7, 8)

  • Promises to commit funds from the Municipal Infrastructure Fund to improve rural traffic safety. (8)

  • Is committed to creating legislation allowing for ridesharing services, such as Uber, while working with taxi companies. (8)

  • Pledges to stop a proposed $400-million bypass around St. Norbert at the south end of Winnipeg and fix existing roads instead, focusing on regional routes that carry the bulk of Manitoba’s traffic. (8, 9)

  • Promises to build a year-round fresh food market in downtown Winnipeg with local produce, meat, and other groceries. (8)

  • Is committed to working in partnership with municipalities on active transportation corridors (e.g. bike lanes) and infrastructure. (11)


  • Pledges to restore bus service to rural communities. (10)

  • Is committed to promoting electric vehicles in Manitoba through “fee-bate” (fee rebate) programs and government fleet purchases. (10)

  • Promises to improve active transportation opportunities, such as cycling, with further infrastructure investments and grants to municipalities to expand their public and active transportation infrastructure. (10)

  • Promises to implement clearer rules for road-sharing between active transportation users and vehicles. (11)

  • Pledges to work with municipalities to adjust snow-clearing strategies so that pedestrian routes take higher priority. (11)

References

  1. Manitoba NDP website
  2. CBC
  3. Manitoba NDP website
  4. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party website
  5. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party platform
  6. CBC
  7. CBC
  8. Manitoba Liberal Party platform
  9. CBC
  10. Manitoba Green Party platform
  11. CAA Manitoba Infrastructure Survey

Jobs Training

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on April 16, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Promises to cover the cost of course fees and living expenses for 1,500 new apprenticeship students per year. (1)

  • Pledges support for Red River College and Assiniboine Community College for women journeypersons to become instructors. (1)

  • Plans to double training opportunities for child care workers in full-time college programs. (2)


  • Promises to increase incentives to become an Early Childhood Educator (ECE), especially by working in partnership with post-secondary institutions to enhance scholarship and bursary opportunities. Also pledges to promote access to ECE training by offering training in more institutions. (3)

  • Is committed to promoting hometown doctors through education in local communities, including exit interviews with departing physicians to understand their reasons for leaving. (4)


  • Promises to invest an additional $30 million in training and retention of early childhood educators. (5)


  • Promises to provide better training for Child and Family Services (CFS) workers in risk assessment procedures. (6)

References

  1. Manitoba NDP website
  2. Manitoba NDP website
  3. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party website
  4. CTV
  5. Manitoba Liberal Party website
  6. Manitoba Green Party website

Personal Taxation

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on April 16, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Pledges to create a new tax bracket for incomes over $170,000, which would be taxed at 20%. These funds would reduce taxes for lower-income and middle class Manitobans, the exact numbers of which have not yet been released. (1, 24)

  • Raised Provincial Sales Tax (PST) from 7% to 8% in 2013. Did not hold a referendum on the PST increase, as had been previously required by the 1995 Balanced Budget Law, because it would have cost at least $12 million dollars and the party wanted to forgo that expense, (2, 3, 4)

  • Pledges to increase the rebate on school taxes seniors pay from $470 to $2300 (5, 24)


  • Pledges to end ‘bracket creep’ (when tax brackets remain the same each year and do not take into account inflationary increases in income) by indexing tax brackets to inflation. (6, 7, 10, 23)

  • Promises to reduce PST from 8% to 7% in its first term in office. (6, 7, 8, 9, 23)

  • Plans to raise the province’s personal exemption rate by at least the rate of inflation in the first budget, helping, in particular, low-income Manitobans. (6, 7, 23)

  • Pledges not to raise income tax or retail tax without having Manitobans vote on any proposed increases, and would instate a mandatory 20% pay cut for premiers and cabinet members if they violate these rules. (6, 7, 8, 9, 23)


  • Pledges to phase out payroll taxes once the provincial budget is balanced, beginning with educational institutions. (11, 12)

  • Promises to remove the Land Transfer Tax (a 0-2% tax rate on the home’s value and mortgage amount) for first-time home buyers. (13, 21)

  • Pledges to remove PST from salon services over $50 (services that cost less than $50 are already exempt) as they feel that this tax that disproportionately affects women. (14)

  • Promises to remove the PST on sporting goods for children aged 14 and under. (15)


  • Promises to implement a Guaranteed Annual Income that will give $6300/year to every Manitoban over the age of 18 who files income tax. By changing income tax structure accordingly, the Green Party’s expects this to increase income of the province’s poor by 22%, increase middle class incomes by 1.7%, and reduce the wealthiest Manitobans’ incomes by 1.5%. (16, 17, 22)

  • Plans to replace the reduced Employment and Income Assistance payments, the Manitoba Child Benefit, the 55PLUS and Rent Assist programs with the Guaranteed Annual Income. (22)

  • Pledges to reduce Manitoba’s bottom personal tax bracket from 10.8% to 9.5%. (22)

  • Promises to eliminate the education property tax, reducing costs for homeowners. (19, 20)

  • Plans to raise the middle tax bracket from 12.75% to 14.14%. (22)

  • Promises to raise the top tax bracket from 17.4% to 19.3%. (22)

References

  1. The Globe and Mail
  2. CBC
  3. CBC
  4. CBC
  5. NDP Website
  6. Winnipeg Free Press
  7. Progressive Conservative Website
  8. CBC
  9. Progressive Conservative Website
  10. Progressive Conservative Website
  11. Liberal Website
  12. Metro News
  13. Liberals Website
  14. Liberal Website
  15. Liberal Website
  16. CBC
  17. CBC
  18. CBC
  19. CBC
  20. Winnipeg Free Press
  21. Rate Hub
  22. Green Party Platform
  23. Progressive Conservative Platform
  24. NDP Website

Post-Secondary Education

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on April 14, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Promises to invest $40 million to replace student loans with grants. (1)

  • Is committed to providing free tuition to students in care up to age 25. (1)

  • Pledges to double funding for the Manitoba Scholarship and Bursary Initiative, from $4.5 million to $9 million. (1)

  • Promises to invest $12 million for student family housing at Brandon University. (1)

  • Plans to launch a pilot program to provide more supports for adult learners looking to upgrade their academic skills before going to university, college or into an apprenticeship. (1)

  • Pledges to keep the Manitoba Tuition Fee Income Tax Rebate in place. (1)

  • Promises to provide $350,000 to help Manitoba colleges and universities support Indigenous culture on campus. (1)

  • Envisions dual-credit courses in all secondary schools, which provide either college or university credits in addition to secondary credits. (2)


  • Promises to increase the Manitoba Scholarship and Bursary Initiative to $20 million from the current $9 million by increasing government funding and seeking more corporate donations. (3)

  • Plans to develop scholarships and bursaries for students in fields with strong labour market outcomes and employability potential. (3)


  • Promises to maintain present funding levels and adjust for inflation. (4)

  • Pledges to turn provincial student loans into non-repayable grants, and to work with the federal government to ensure the feds do the same. This is projected to cost $10 million annually. (4, 5)

  • Plans to repeal current legislation that scales back student loans if a student earns more than $100 per week, so that students are not punished for working. (4)


  • Pledges to enhance arts education, including expanding the availability of arts education in elementary schools, high schools, and post-secondary educational institutions. (6)

References

  1. NDP website
  2. Association of Manitoba Municipalities (AMM) Leaders’ Debate:
  3. CBC
  4. CBC Education Debate
  5. Liberal Party Platform
  6. Manitobans for the Arts Survey

Primary and Secondary Education

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on April 14, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Promises to continue funding public schools at or above the rate of economic growth. (1)

  • Pledges $50 million toward public schools, including $20 million for upgrades to arts classrooms, $10 million for modern technology, $10 million for a School Safety Access Fund, and $10 million for play structures. (1)

  • Promises $30 million toward shop classes and $20 million for science labs. (1)

  • Introduced Bill 18, an anti-bullying law that focuses on schools, including the protection of Gay-Straight Alliances. (2)

  • Envisions dual-credit courses in all secondary schools, which provide either college or university credits in addition to secondary credits. (3)

  • Is committed to keeping class sizes small. (4)

  • Plans to make targeted investments into breakfast programs, early reading, and math support. (4)



  • Promises to establish a ‘Read to Succeed’ initiative with reading labs and mentoring in an effort to improve students’ literacy rates in the long term. This includes the establishment of a “clear and reputable” benchmarking system. (5)

  • Pledges to empower educators to evaluate student work as they see fit, including giving a zero grade for zero work. (5)

  • Endeavours to reduce the red tape in special needs education funding applications. (5)

  • Promises to give teachers full professional discretion to provide report cards in plain language, including the ability to comment on student behaviour. (5)


  • Pledges to provide all-day Kindergarten in view of improving students’ cognitive preparation and reducing the income gap in education, at a cost of $50 million over five years. (6)

  • Promises to provide applied behaviour analysis to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, at a cost of $3 million. (6)

  • Is committed to working with teachers and school districts to raise the amount of physical education students receive, which the party claims will save healthcare money. (6)

  • Plans to build a new school in south Brandon. (6)


  • Promises to eliminate property-based school taxes and replace funding with corporate and funding income tax, in view of fixing inequities. (4, 7)

  • Pledges to remove junk food from schools to help combat obesity. (7)

  • Is committed to enhancing arts education, including expanding the availability of arts education in elementary schools, high schools, and post-secondary educational institutions. (8)

References

  1. Manitoba NDP website
  2. CBC
  3. Association of Manitoba Municipalities (AMM) Leaders’ Debate:
  4. CBC Education Debate
  5. Manitoba Progressive Conservatives Party platform
  6. Manitoba Liberal Party platform
  7. Manitoba Green Party platform
  8. Manitobans for the Arts Survey

Seniors

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on April 14, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Promises to create 1,000 new personal care home beds (PCHs), and to issue a call for proposals for additional community built and owned, non-profit PCH facilities, including one in the North. (1)

  • Is committed to protecting seniors using home care from user fees and other moves towards privatization. (1)

  • Pledges to improve home care with extended respite hours, expanded pilot programs offering longer after-hours services, and more support for intensive home care services. (1)

  • Promises to create new hospice beds by working with community groups like Jocelyn House and funding a new research chair in palliative care with the University of Manitoba. (1)

  • Plans to increase the Seniors’ School Tax Rebate from $470 to $2,300 for the 2016 property year. This will mean 98 percent of seniors pay no more school taxes, while the wealthiest two percent of seniors continue to pay some school taxes. (2)


  • Promises to fast-track the construction of 1200 new personal care home beds (PCHs), and will develop a framework to do so, for a total cost of $160 million per year. (3)

  • Pledges to create the province’s first dedicated stroke unit. (3)


  • Promises to create the province’s first dedicated stroke unit. The party claims this will cost $7.5 million annually, but savings to the system are $70 million annually, for a net gain of $62 million. (4)

  • Pledges to implement a pay-for-results system for faster knee and hip surgery, which the party argues is cost-neutral. (4)

  • Is committed to providing free ambulance services for seniors with an income lower than $20,000, at a cost of $1.5 million annually. (4)


  • Pledges to end elder poverty through its guaranteed annual income program. (5)

  • Promises to expand resources to help to keep people living in their homes longer. (5)

  • Is committed to protecting pensions from corporate skimming and bankruptcies. (5)

References

  1. NDP website
  2. NDP website
  3. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party platform
  4. Manitoba Liberal Party platform
  5. Manitoba Green Party platform
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