Saskatchewan 2016

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Aboriginal Issues

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on November 27, 2015

As of February 5th, there are 18 Indigenous candidates running in this election. Seven are running for the Liberal Party, six for the NDP, and five for the Progressive Conservatives. (1)

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  • Authorized a deployment of Canadian forces to launch airstrikes against ISIS where it has the permission of host government and deployed 69 Canadian troops in a non-combat role to advise Iraqi security forces in October 2014 for a period of six months (3, 4, 5)

  • Launched a one year extension to the original plan ending in 2016; the new plan now allows for warplanes to enter Syria without President Assad’s permission and does not call for any additional troops or Canadian special forces in Syria (2)

  • Followed through on Prime Minister Harper's promise that any combat missions would be subject to debate and vote in the House of Commons, though they do not ordinarily require Common’s approval (6)

  • Pledged $67 million to help Iraq deal with the threat posed by ISIS, and an additional $139 million to Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon to alleviate the refugee crisis brought about by the Islamic State (1)

  • Let me assure Canadians that the government is seized with the necessity of avoiding a prolonged 'quagmire' in this part of the world. Indeed, we and our allies are acting now precisely to avoid a situation that was clearly headed to a wider, protracted and much more dangerous conflict. Let me also say that the military measures we are taking do not in any way preclude humanitarian actions. There is no either/or here (3)


  • Voted against the initial mission in October 2014 and its extension in March 2015 (2, 4)

  • Pledged to withdraw Canadian troops from the Iraq mission if elected (7)

  • Accused the Conservative Party of plunging Canada into a prolonged war without any credible long-term strategy or withdrawal plan (3, 6)

  • Believes that Canada’s role should not be a combat one, but one that builds credible institutions in Iraq and Syria and that addresses the dire humanitarian situation (8)

  • Tabled an amendment to the Conservative plan in October 2014 that would get rid of combat operations, and instead investigate ISIS’ war crimes and the transportation of weapons to Iraq, emphasizing humanitarian aid; the amendment was supported by the Liberals, Green Party, and Bloc (6)

  • The tragedy in Iraq and Syria will not end with another Western-led invasion in that region. It will end by helping the people of Iraq and Syria to build the political, institutional, and security capabilities they need to oppose these threats themselves (3)


  • Voted against the October 2014 deployment and March 2015 extension of the Canadian forces combat missions in Iraq, citing a lack of clarity, consultation, long-term planning (2, 3, 6, 9)

  • Proposes that Canada focus on humanitarian aid to help the region instead of engaging in a combat role (2, 3, 4, 9)

  • Supported an amendment proposed by the NDP in October 2014 that would get rid of combat operations and instead investigate ISIS’ war crimes and the transportation of weapons to Iraq, emphasizing humanitarian aid (4)

  • Supported the deployment of 69 Canadian soldiers to provide advice and training to Iraqi and Kurdish forces fighting ISIS (6, 9)

  • At the end of every decision to enter combat is a brave Canadian in harm’s way. We owe them clarity. We owe them a plan. Most of all, we owe them the truth. The prime minister has offered none of those (3)


  • Green Party leader Elizabeth May voted against the initial mission in October 2014 and its extension in March 2015 (4, 11)

  • Green Party leader Elizabeth May supported an amendment made by Mr. Mulcair and the NDP in October 2014 that would get rid of combat operations and instead investigate ISIS’ war crimes and the transportation of weapons to Iraq, emphasizing humanitarian aid (4)

  • Green Party MP Bruce Hyder voted in favour of the initial mission in October 2014, then voted against its extension in March 2015 (6, 11)

  • Believes Canada should focus on sending humanitarian aid, working to stop the flow of weapons and illegal oil sales, and supporting the UN in creating peacekeeping forces (12)

  • Bombing has never ended an Islamic or any religious extremist terrorist threat. It has, in fact, time after time again made matters worse. Let's try to look at the lessons of history before we go to war again (3)

References

  1. CBC
  2. CBC
  3. Manitoba NDP website
  4. CBC
  5. Manitoba NDP website
  6. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party website
  7. Manitoba Progressive Conservative Party platform
  8. Manitoba Liberal Party platform
  9. Winnipeg Free Press
  10. Manitoba Green Party website:
  11. CBC
  12. CBC

Day Care and Child Care

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on March 25, 2016

Synopsis

In Saskatchewan, virtually all child care centres are not-for-profit. The Ministry of Education is responsible for childcare, kindergarten, and pre-kindergarten services, and, the Ministry of Social Services is responsible for the Child Care Fee Subsidy Program, which helps families offset the cost of licensed child care. These range from $330 to $570 per month. (1)

In 2012, Saskatchewan was spending an average of $389 per child aged 0 to 12, whereas the national average* was $528. It also spend an average of $5104 per child-care space, compared to the national average* of $3513.

In 2010, Saskatchewan had a caregiver-to-child ratio of 1:3 for children under one year of age, compared to the national average* of 1:4. For children aged five and under, this ratio was 1:10, which matches the national average. (2)

*All figures for the national average exclude Quebec, which implemented a universal $7/day childcare policy and is an outlier in terms of most child care measures.

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  • Will include 810 licensed child-care spaces in the nine joint-use schools under construction in Saskatoon, Regina, Martensville, and Warman (3)

  • Has increased the number of licensed child-care spaces by 104%, or nearly 5000, since 2007 (3, 4)


  • Promises to double funding for Early Childhood Intervention Programs and Early Childhood Development Programs at a cost of $9.7 million over four years (5, 6)

  • Will build 2,000 new child care spaces and establish an “early learning and child-care registry” to examine the need for child care (5)


  • The Saskatchewan Liberal Party has not articulated its plans for daycare or child care


  • The Saskatchewan Green party has not articulated its plans for daycare or child care

References

  1. Finding Quality Childcare
  2. Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, page 18
  3. Saskatchewan Party Platform, page 24
  4. Saskatoon Star Phoenix
  5. Saskatchewan NDP Platform
  6. CBC News

Democratic Reform

Part of Governance
Updated on March 27, 2016

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Increased the number of constituencies and Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) in the province from 58 to 61 due to increases in the province’s population (1, 5)


  • Pledges to cut at least three cabinet minister positions and get rid of their political staff in view of saving $6.9 million over the second term (2)

  • Pledges to cut the number of MLAs from 61 to 55 to save approximately $5.5 million over four years (2, 5)

  • Promises to review campaign finance rules (2)


  • Promises to limit political donations to $3,000 per year for individuals, corporations, and labour unions (3)

  • Pledges to reduce the number of MLAs from 61 to 48 (3)

  • Committed to reviewing all government procurement procedures to ensure they are fair, transparent and in the best interest of taxpayers (3)

  • Pledges to conduct broad consultations to consider alternatives to the current “first-past-the-post” voting system (3)


  • Promises to implement proportional representation in time for the next provincial election (4)

  • Pledges to ban all corporate and union donations (4)

  • Committed to reviewing the current system of political donations from individual citizens and consider implementing public-only funding for all parties (4)

References

  1. Elections Saskatchewan
  2. Saskatchewan NDP platform
  3. Liberal Party platform
  4. Green Party platform
  5. CBC

Energy East Pipeline

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on March 25, 2016

Synopsis

Energy East is a proposed pipeline by the Trans-Canada Corporation that would transport approximately 1.1 million barrels per day from oil fields in Alberta and Saskatchewan to refineries in eastern Canada and then to a marine terminal in New Brunswick. The pipeline would benefit oil producers, allowing them to gain access to international buyers, and create jobs during the pipeline’s construction, as well as in eastern oil refineries and prairie oil fields. (1, 2)

The pipeline would cross the traditional territories of over 180 aboriginal communities, with whom stakeholders are legally bound to consult about any major infrastructure project within their lands, although many communities oppose the pipeline due to potential damage to their lands and lack of consultation from the company (3, 4). Others across Canada oppose the greatly increased carbon emissions that the project would lead to, estimated by the Pembina Institute to release around 30 to 32 million tonnes of annual emissions, and the high environmental risk with few benefits for the rest of Canada (4, 5, 12).

Pipelines that cross provincial boundaries are subject to a federal environmental review process by the National Energy Board that then issues a recommendation to the federal cabinet who make the final decision. Provinces can conduct their own reviews, which are then considered in the National Energy Board process. (6)

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Supports the construction of the pipeline (7)

  • Opposes linking Energy East to federal climate change targets (8)

  • Is critical of new review mechanisms for pipelines introduced by the federal Liberal government, arguing that the assessment of major pipeline projects based on emissions produced in the extraction and processing of oil is unfair since that is not done for other industries like automotive or chemicals (7)

  • Believes that provinces should be able to provide input to national regulators on pipelines but not be able to block it, and has been critical of Quebec’s proposed injunction against the pipeline (due to TransCanada not acknowledging that it must pass a provincial environmental impact assessment, which the company believes it is solely within the federal jurisdiction) (7, 9)


  • Supports the construction of the Energy East pipeline (10, 11)


  • The Liberal Party has not clearly articulated its position on Energy East


  • The Green Party has not clearly articulated its position on Energy East

References

  1. CBC
  2. Global News
  3. Globe and Mail
  4. National Post
  5. Pembina Institute
  6. Global News
  7. CBC
  8. CBC
  9. Global News
  10. CBC
  11. CTV News Regina
  12. Globe and Mail

Government Spending

Part of Governance
Updated on March 27, 2016

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Pledges to control spending and maintain fiscal discipline; has indicated that it will not be making many new spending promises while the province is in financial difficulty (1, 5)

  • Promises to use the province’s oil revenues to build a $500 million balance for the province’s Growth and Financial Security Fund once the price of oil rebounds to $75 U.S. dollars per barrel. Once the fund reaches $500 million, the Saskatchewan Party pledges to dedicate additional funds to debt repayment (1)

  • Believes that its platform’s promises over 4 years will cost $105.4 million total, excluding the $2 billion Highways First infrastructure plan (1)

  • Aims to return the province’s finances to a surplus by the 2017-2018 fiscal year (1)


  • Believes its plan can save at least $836 million by cutting existing government programs and policies and reallocating these funds to the party’s election promises (2)

  • Promises to repurpose one of the government’s Executive Air airplanes as an Air Ambulance and sell the other two, expecting to save $7 million over its first term and earning $4 million through the sale of the planes (2)

  • Pledges to cut at least three cabinet ministers and their associated political staff, and reduce the political staff in the Executive Council by 15% to save $6.9 million in the government’s first term (2)

  • Pledges to cut six MLAs for the next election, saving an expected $5.5 million over the government’s second term (2)

  • Promises to cut 70% of private advisors and consultants, saving $244 million over the government’s first term. This is in addition to reduced spending on external and foreign contractors, expected to save $110 million over four years (2)

  • Pledges to cut the Lean program, which is intended to reduce waste in the public sector and especially in healthcare. The program has allegedly cost more than it has saved, and cutting it provides expected savings of $82 million over four years (2, 6)

  • Has not fully costed all of the party’s platform promises (3)


  • Pledges to review the Lean system in health care (4)

  • Promises to reduce the Legislature to 48 members from 61 following the 2016 provincial to save government funds (4)


  • The Green Party has not release specifics in regards to government expenditure

References

  1. Saskatchewan Party platform
  2. New Democrats platform
  3. Global News
  4. Liberal Party platform
  5. Leaderpost
  6. Leaderpost

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on March 25, 2016

Synopsis

The federal and provincial governments are currently discussing a new national strategy to fight climate change with some form of carbon pricing, though it has not been decided whether this will be in the form of cap and trade or a carbon tax. Currently, Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec either have or are planning to adopt some form of carbon pricing. Canada’s four Atlantic provinces are in discussion about creating a joint climate action plan, potentially including carbon pricing. (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Many Saskatchewanians have expressed concern that any additional costs could further endanger the fossil fuel industry in the province, which is already damaged by low oil costs. However, other premiers and experts have indicated that this is not necessarily the case. (5, 7, 9)

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  • Opposes any form of carbon tax and said it would not sign onto any Federal-Provincial agreement that includes one (6, 8, 9)

  • Believes that some form of carbon pricing could eventually be put into place so long as the funds went into a provincial technology fund for projects such as carbon-capture and storage (7)

  • Passed a bill in 2011 that would have made heavy industrial polluters pay into a green technology fund, but never implemented it (7)

  • Believes climate change action should be focused on technology and innovation, and not on taxation or restrictions on the fossil fuel industry (9)

  • Supports the reduction of emissions through carbon-capture and sequestration, and have invested more than a billion into the carbon-capture and storage project at the Boundary Dam coal-fired power station (10, 11)


  • Opposes any kind of ‘carbon tax’ on the economy as a whole (9)

  • Believes that some form of carbon pricing could eventually be put into place so long as the funds went into a provincial revenues (7, 9)

  • Pledges to implement a new technology fund with a price on carbon for major emitters with compliance payments used to fund renewable energy innovation in Saskatchewan (9, 12, 13)

  • Pledges to restore the province’s climate change and environmental assessment and protection program (13)


  • The Liberal Party of Saskatchewan has not clearly articulated its position on the issue of carbon taxation

  • Please see the party’s position on renewable energy for more information


  • Opposes a carbon tax and believes there are better ways to curb Greenhouse Gas Emissions without burdening those who live in northern and remote communities (13)

  • Emphasizes its plans for increasing the use of renewable energy. For more information, click here.

References

  1. Global News
  2. The Star Phoenix
  3. CTV News
  4. The Globe and Mail
  5. iPolitics
  6. CBC
  7. CBC
  8. Global News
  9. Financial Post
  10. The Globe and Mail
  11. CBC
  12. CBC
  13. NDP Sustainability Plan
  14. Green Party Facebook Page

Health Care

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on March 25, 2016

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Promises the partial privatization of CT scans. This will be done as a pay-for-private-services system that will exist alongside the public system. For every scan provided privately, the clinic providing the scan must provide one scan to a person on the public wait list. (1)

  • Promises to reduce health administration costs by $7.5 million and put these funds toward more front-line staff in long-term care facilities. This 5% spending reduction will be put toward 30 Registered Nurses, 30 Licensed Practical Nurses, and 35 Continuing Care aides, or 140 new Continuing Care aides. (1)

  • Pledges to expand the Remote Presence Medical Robotic Technology project to more communities in the north through a funding increase of $500,000 annually. (1)

  • Promises to increase funding to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind to aid the incorporation of vision loss rehabilitation into Saskatchewan’s health system. (1)

  • Commits to extending job protection for palliative care leave under the Saskatchewan Employment Act to 26 weeks (up from 16 weeks, unpaid) over a one-year period. This is intended to complement changes to federal Employment Insurance that extended benefits to 26 weeks for palliative care leave as of January 2016. (1)


  • Promises to repurpose one of the government’s three Executive Air airplanes for the Air Ambulance program. (2)

  • Pledges to cut the Lean program, which intends to reduce waste in the public sector and especially in health care. This cut is expected to save $82 million over four years. (2)

  • Commits to fixing and expanding hospitals and care homes, making proper use of under-utilized facilities, and building new ones where needed. (2)

  • Promises more long-term care and hospice spaces, increased supports for home care services, and more palliative care services and specialists. (2)

  • Commits to hiring 25 nurse practitioners for emergency rooms, establishing a Fast-Track system, improving front-line patient flow, and opening Extended-hour Quick Care Clinics to reduce wait times. This is expected to reduce urgent care wait times of 30 minutes and emergency care wait times of 15 minutes by December 2018, followed by one-hour wait times for non-urgent care by December 2019. (2)

  • Pledges to improve mental health service by providing coverage for children and youth (up to 8 counselling sessions per year), creating two mental health clinics, and hiring more mental health workers to work with police in urban areas and in northern Saskatchewan. (2)

  • Promises to reduce rural barriers to health through the development of a Rural Health Strategy, including minimizing the gap between urban and rural ambulance fees and improving accessibility in underserviced regions. (2)


  • Opposes the creation of private MRI clinics. (3)

  • Pledges to adopt the recommendations of the 2015 Saskatchewan Advisory Group on Poverty to prioritize disease prevention and health promotion, target these initiatives to communities with high rates of poverty, and commit resources to community-based organizations for a more community-oriented health model. (3)

  • Promises to provide subsidies and a 24-hour RN nursing station (staffed by the local health region) to all private companies that incorporate a minimum of 25% of their care beds to Level 2 senior care, and to build these companies’ affiliation with the health region to ensure a minimum standard of care. (3)

  • Pledges to review the Lean system in health care. (3)

  • Commits to strengthening health region leadership, increasing CEO accountability, reduce emergency room wait times, and consult with health care workers to restore public confidence in the healthcare system. (3)

  • Promises to increase access to midwifery services (3)


  • Promises to make doctors salaried, rather than the current per-service model used throughout Canada. (4)

  • Pledges to eliminate ambulance fees instead paying for them through Medicare. (4)

  • Promises to expand the provincial drug plan to cover all citizens, cover all drugs, and lower the cost to citizens to $15 per prescription. (4)

  • Commits to expanding provincial Medicare to cover dental, optical, and other uninsured services including alternative therapies. (4)

  • Will define “timely access” to health care services. (4)

  • Promises to ensure all women have adequate access to midwives, and will create a midwifery review board to regulate, license, and review midwives’ performance. Midwifery will be covered by Medicare. (4)

References

  1. Saskatchewan Party platform
  2. New Democratic Party platform
  3. Liberal Party platform
  4. Green Party platform

Infrastructure

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on March 26, 2016

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  • Commits to investing in highways and transportation infrastructure through its Highways 2020 Plan, which is expected to cost $2.7 billion over four years. This spending does not include the Regina Bypass. (1)

  • Promises to increase spending on highway repairs through a $70 million funding increase over the next three years (2016-2019). (1)

  • Prioritizes highways and municipal infrastructure projects for future federal infrastructure funding through the Building Canada Fund. This will be combined with a commitment to exploring a public-private partnership (P3) model to if this approach saves money or allows the projects to be completed more quickly. (1)


  • Pledges to eliminate the SaskBuilds ministry, brings together government and the private sector through public private partnerships (P3s) for infrastructure projects, saving at least $62 million in the first term. The party views SaskBuilds as the “privatization ministry.” Infrastructure responsibilities will shift to the Ministry of Highways, which the party views as most cost effective. (2)

  • The party will review cuts to the Saskatchewan Transportation Company (STC), the public bus company, and reinstate cancelled routes where possible. (2)

  • Promises to expand SaskWater’s grid to provide more communities with potable drinking water, with an emphasis on First Nations communities. (2)


  • Promises to develop infrastructure initiatives that allow Saskatchewan to get its resources to market. This focuses on pipeline development running from the south of the province to the north, collaborating with the private sector to construct new refineries, and connecting these refineries to the Manitoba Port of Churchill pipeline. (3)


  • The Green Party has no stated promises in its platform related to infrastructure.

References

  1. Saskatchewan Party platform
  2. New Democrats platform
  3. Liberal Party platform

Post-Secondary Education

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on March 26, 2016

Synopsis

Post-secondary tuition has been rising each year. Students in Saskatchewan pay an average of $6,885 per academic year, second only to Ontario students, who pay an average of $7,868.

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  • Introduced the Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship in 2011, which provides $500 per year for up to four years for Saskatchewan high school students who go onto post-secondary education within the province (1)

  • Promises to increase the Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship from $500 to $750 per student, per year when the province’s finances improve (2, 3, 4)

  • Pledges to create the First Home Plan, which would allow Graduate Retention Program recipients to put up to $10,000 of their unused benefits towards a down payment on a first home; this would take the form of an interest free-loan that they would not have to repay as long as they keep the house for at least four years (2, 3, 4)

  • Changed the Graduate Retention Program in 2015 from being a fixed, $2,000, refundable tax credit into a non-refundable tax credit, and extended the timeframe for benefit collection from seven to ten years. This means that those who make less than $40,000 or more in gross income will not receive the full benefit (11, 12)


  • Pledges to increase the Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship from $500 to $1000 per student, per year (4, 5, 6)

  • Promises to eliminate interest charges on all student loans and convert all provincial student loans to non-repayable grants by 2017 (4, 5, 6)

  • Pledges to regulate and lower tuition fees for all the province's’ post-secondary institutions (5)


  • Pledges to reduce the interest rate on government student loans to the lowest rate of borrowing available to the Provincial government (7)

  • Promises to stabilize provincial funding for universities to help stabilize tuition rates (7, 8)

  • Pledges to de-link a student’s family income, employment income, and assets from Saskatchewan student loan qualifications (7)


  • Pledges to phase out all tuition for post-secondary students in Saskatchewan over a four-year period (9, 10)

  • Promises to immediately reinstate the original Graduate Retention Program, thus increasing the refundable tax portion and lowering the waiting time to four years (9, 11, 12)

References

  1. Saskatchewan Party Platform, page 8
  2. CBC
  3. Saskatchewan Party Platform
  4. The Star Phoenix
  5. CBC
  6. Saskatchewan NDP Platform, page 10
  7. Saskatchewan Liberal Platform, page 10
  8. Saskatchewan Liberal Party Website,
  9. Saskatchewan Green Party Website
  10. Saskatchewan Green Party Website
  11. CBC
  12. Global News

Poverty

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on March 25, 2016

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Pledges to allow senior homeowners with to defer the education portion of their property taxes starting in 2017 provided that their household income is under $70,000, they have a minimum 25% equity in their home, and adequate fire insurance coverage (1)

  • Introduced the Low Income Tax Credit in 2008, which benefits low-income earners and those with fixed incomes, taking approximately low-income 112,000 off the tax role (1, 5, 6, 7)


  • Pledges to raise the basic personal income tax exemption and create a new tax bracket for those individuals with an income of $175,000 or greater. This plan is expected to save 70% of households money while raising tax on 3% of households. (2)

  • Promises to create 2,500 new affordable and social housing units, focusing on those communities with the greatest housing needs, along with the restoration of the rent-to-own model for those in social housing. This will support the platform’s promise of a Housing First strategy. (2)

  • Is committed to increasing the minimum wage to $11.25 per hour in October 2016, and to at least $13.25 per hour by 2018. (2)

  • Promotes “living wage” initiatives, and will develop a Living Wage Employer Recognition Program. This is in addition to the development of a basic income pilot. (2)

  • Is committed to the expansion of the Saskatchewan Employment Supplement to provide additional money to low-income parents who work and have children under 18. (2)

  • Pledges to implement a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy. (2)


  • Promises to raise the basic personal income tax exemption to a level equivalent with a full-time, minimum wage job as of January 2017. This will accompany a Working Tax Credit, which will refund the federal income tax collected on earned income up to the revised Saskatchewan basic personal income tax exemption. (3)

  • Is committed to increasing the minimum wage to $11.75 per hour in July 2016, and to $13.00 per hour in July 2017. (3, 8)

  • Promises to introduce a tax incentive system that would create more affordable rental units. (3)


  • Promises to create a Saskatchewan Assured Income for Everyone (SAIE) in which citizens whose annual incomes fall below the poverty line receive a supplement to bring their income up to the poverty line. For those more than $2000 under the poverty line, this supplement will be paid as an annual lump sum rather than monthly. (4)

References

  1. Saskatchewan Party platform
  2. New Democrats platform
  3. Liberal Party platform
  4. Green Party platform
  5. Government of Saskatchewan Website
  6. NDP Platform
  7. Leaderpost
  8. Global News

Poverty

Part of Sociocultural
Updated on April 14, 2016

ndppcliberalgreen

  • Pledges to institute a 50 cent increase to the minimum wage every year. (1, 2, 3)

  • Promises to reduce taxes for low- and middle-income workers. (1, 2)

  • Pledges to launch a targeted, income-based needs benefit for low-income, single Manitobans who would see their benefits increase by 16%. (1)

  • Pledges to create 300 net new social housing units every year. (1)


  • Pledges to raise the province’s personal exemption rate within the first term, helping, in particular, low-income Manitobans. (4, 5, 6)

  • Promises to end ‘bracket creep’ (when tax brackets remain the same each year and do not take into account inflationary increases in income) by indexing tax brackets to inflation. (4, 5, 6)


  • Pledges to freeze rent for two calendar years starting in 2017 to affect all renewals during 2018, and will use this time to review rent control strategies. (7)

  • Pledges to introduce a guaranteed minimum income, giving those over a certain age a guaranteed wage paid by the government, while those who don’t need it would repay it monthly through their payroll deductions. (8)

  • Pledges to invest an additional $15 million yearly to help address the housing crisis on northern Manitoba First Nations. While this is a federal jurisdiction, the Manitoba Liberals believe it is best to spearhead this effort themselves. (9)

  • Pledges to create subsidies for healthy food options like milk, fresh fruit and vegetables for northern communities. (10)


  • Promises to implement a Guaranteed Annual Income that will give $6300/year to every Manitoban over the age of 18 who files income tax (and will be reduced at the rate of 16% for every additional member of the family who receives the benefit). With the changes to income tax included, the Green Party’s expects this to increase income of the province’s poor by 22%, increase middle class incomes by 1.7%, and reduce the incomes of the wealthiest Manitobans by 1.5%. (11)

  • Pledges to replace the reduced Employment and Income Assistance payments, the Manitoba Child Benefit, the 55PLUS and Rent Assist programs with the Guaranteed Annual Income. (11)

  • Plans to reduce Manitoba’s bottom personal tax bracket from 10.8% to 9.5%. (11)

  • Pledges to make all transit fare-free and expand service for transit systems across the province by restoring service to rural communities. (11)

  • Promises to reduce Manitoba’s bottom income tax bracket from 10.8% to 9.5%. (11)

References

  1. NDP Website
  2. CBC
  3. CBC
  4. Winnipeg Free Press
  5. Progressive Conservative Website
  6. Progressive Conservative Platform
  7. Manitoba Liberal Website
  8. Manitoba Liberal Website
  9. Manitoba Liberal Website
  10. Manitoba Liberal Website
  11. Green Party Platform

Privatization

Part of Governance
Updated on March 26, 2016

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Pledges to convert 40 government-owned (SLGA) liquor stores into private stores, add 12 new private liquor stores, and create a less regulated system where retailers can provide consumers with more choice, convenience, and competitive pricing. (1)

  • Promises the partial privatization of CT scans. This will be done as a pay for private services system that would exist alongside the public system, similar to the party’s earlier privatization of MRIs. It will also use a “two for one” model, where for every scan provided privately, the clinic providing the scan must provide one scan to a person on the public wait list. (1)

  • Has indicated that it will not sell off any major crown corporations without including the proposal as part of its election platform, and has not indicated that it intends to sell any (4)


  • Opposes the use of public-private partnerships or P3s and pledges to eliminate the SaskBuilds ministry, which brings together government and the private sector through public private partnerships (P3s) for infrastructure projects, saving at least $62 million in the first term. Infrastructure responsibilities will shift to the Ministry of Highways, which the party views as most cost effective. (2)

  • Promises to end privatization and instead focus on improving the province’s existing Crown corporations. This includes modernizing public (SLGA) liquor stores through expanded cold beer options, better hours, selection, and prices, and putting SLGA kiosks in interested grocery stores to sell beer and wine. (2)


  • The Liberal Party has no stated promises in their platform related to privatization.


  • Proposes replacing Crown corporations with Crown co-operatives through amendments to the Crown Corporations Act. These co-operatives will be owned by the province, but directed as co-operatives, with their boards elected by the members and citizens of the province. Profits will be distributed to Saskatchewanians through yearly dividends. (4)

References

  1. Saskatchewan Party platform
  2. New Democrats platform
  3. Liberal Party platform
  4. Regina Leader Post

Renewable Energy

Part of The Economy and Environment
Updated on November 27, 2015

saskatchewan partyndpliberalsskgreen

  • Pledges to generate half of the province’s electricity from renewable energy by 2030 (twice the amount it does now), through solar, wind, and geothermal (1)

  • Opposed NDP-introduced legislation in 2015 to mandate that the province generate half of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030 (1)

  • Believes that some form of carbon pricing could eventually be put into place so long as the funds went into a provincial technology fund for projects such as carbon capture and storage (2)

  • Passed a law in 2011 that would have made heavy industrial polluters pay into a green technology fund, but then never implemented it (2)

  • Believes climate change action should be focused on technology and innovation and not taxation or restrictions on fossil fuels industry (3)


  • Introduced legislation in 2015 that would mandate that the province generate half of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030 (it was defeated due to opposition by the Saskatchewan Party) (1)

  • Pledges to implement a new technology fund with a price on carbon for major emitters with compliance payments used to fund renewable energy innovation here in Saskatchewan (1, 3, 4)

  • Pledges to increase the use of clean power in Saskatchewan (4)

  • Believes the government has spent far too much money on carbon capture technology without it producing sufficient results (5)


  • Will mandate that SaskPower purchase locally produced renewable energy at a fair market rate from individuals and businesses (6)

  • Will offer an income tax rebate to homeowners, businesses, and farms to cover up to 25% of the costs of installing solar or wind generation facilities (6)


  • Pledges to help citizens and businesses create and sell surplus renewable power they produce SaskPower by the use of a feed-in tariff to create a long-term green energy grid (7, 8)

  • Pledges to foster solar, wind, and geothermal energy development in the province (7)

References

  1. CBC
  2. CBC
  3. Financial Post
  4. NDP Sustainability Plan
  5. CBC
  6. Liberal Plan
  7. Green Party Platform
  8. Green Party Facebook Page
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