Federal 2021: The Economy

Federal 2021: The Economy

Disclaimer

The policies outlined below are incomplete and will be updated as we approach the election so be sure to check in with us before the big day. This was put together by humans and is therefore imperfect. If you spot something missing or that appears biased please let us know through the “bull” button. Thank you, and happy choosing!

The 2021 federal election is upon us and platforms are dropping left, right, and centre. Rather than throw absolutely everything at you, we here at iCanParty will present platform items based upon overall themes. Where are these themes coming from? In the early weeks of the campaign, Angus Reid polled Canadians to find out what they felt were the most important things to them in the election campaign. Using this, we can examine party platforms plank by plank based upon the themes that Canadians find most important. In the end, voters will have to settle on a local candidate and a party at large to cast their vote. In the meantime, however, you can use our system to select which items are most important to you, personally, and build your own wish list of policy!

The theme presented here is that of The Economy. Economic matters are a perennially popular issue in democratic elections across the globe. There is an entire strain of electoral behaviour studies that centers on ‘economic voting’, which typically means that a particular study focuses on how voters perceptions of the economy affects their voting behaviour. In my master’s research project I found some evidence for the idea that, in second order elections at least, pocketbook voting (or the direct benefits that some voters receive from getting a particular party into office) plays an actual role. Most scholars believe that there is a much stronger case for economic voting, but I think it’s because they focus primarily on first order elections to make that argument. Party platform planks related to this topic are listed below; links to the full party platforms can be found at the bottom.

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  • Restore employment to pre-pandemic levels—going beyond one million jobs—and ensure that the jobs that are created are good, well-paying jobs

  • Continue to expand the Canada Workers Benefit to support about 1 million additional Canadians in low-wage jobs, helping them return to work and increasing benefits for Canada’s most vulnerable, who will be eligible for up to $1,400 a year.

  • Continue to ensure that secondary earners—mostly women—can exclude up to $14,000 of their working income when income-testing the Canada Workers Benefit, so that families can receive up to $2,400.

  • Introduce a new EI benefit for self-employed Canadians, delivered through the tax system, that would provide unemployment assistance comparable to EI and lasting for as much as 26 weeks. This could provide support of nearly $15,500 when it is needed most.

  • Self-employed Canadians seeking to access this benefit would only be responsible to contribute the portion they would normally pay if they were a salaried employee

  • Strengthen rights for workers employed by digital platforms so that they are entitled to job protections under the Canada Labour Code and establish new provisions in the Income Tax Act to ensure this work counts toward EI and CPP while also making these platforms pay associated contributions as any employer would.

  • Move forward with a stronger and more inclusive EI system that addresses gaps made obvious during COVID-19.

  • Establish an EI Career Insurance Benefit. This benefit will be available to people who have worked continuously for the same employer for five or more years and are laid off when the business closes. The Career Insurance Benefit will kick in after regular EI ends, providing an additional 20% of insured earnings in the first year following the layoff, and an extra 10% in the second year. This will give workers up to an almost $16,900 over two years, providing significant help at a difficult time.

  • Extend the Home Expense deduction for an additional 2 years, through the 2022 tax year, and increase the deductible amount to $500

  • Provide up to 5 new paid leave days for federally regulated employees who experience a miscarriage or stillbirth, which can happen in up to 1 in 5 pregnancies.

  • Strengthen provisions in the Canada Labour Code to better support women that need to be temporarily re-assigned to other duties during pregnancy and while breast-feeding.

  • Create a fairer collective bargaining process by introducing legislation to prohibit the use of replacement workers, “scabs,” when a union employer in a federally regulated industry has locked out employees.

  • Work with federally regulated employers and labour groups to co-develop a new policy for the right to disconnect so that workers can disconnect at the end of a workday without worrying about job security and restore healthy work-life balance.

  • Protect public post-secondary educational institutions, such as Laurentian University, from being subject to corporate restructuring.

  • Double the Union Training and Innovation program to $50 million a year to support more apprenticeship training opportunities and additional partnerships in the Red Seal trades across Canada, and target more participation from women, Indigenous people, newcomers, persons with disabilities, and Black and racialized Canadians

  • Move forward on our plan to establish a new Apprenticeship Service which will connect 55,000 first-year apprentices in Red Seal trades with opportunities at small and medium-sized employers.

  • Extend the Canada Recovery Hiring Program to March 31, 2022, so businesses can hire more workers and Canadians can get back on the job.

  • Provide Canada’s hard-hit tourism industry with temporary wage and rent support of up to 75% of their expenses to help them get through the winter

  • Give microgrants of up to $2,400 to smaller Main Street businesses so they can afford the costs of new technology

  • Create training and work opportunities for as many as 28,000 young people so they can assist small and medium-sized businesses in adopting new technology.

  • Offer zero-interest loans to small and medium-sized businesses so they can finance larger technology adoption projects.

  • increase annual financing for the Canada Small Business Financing Program by an estimated $560 million, supporting approximately 2,900 additional small businesses.

  • Keep moving forward with our plan to boost business investment by allowing privately owned, Canadian-controlled businesses to immediately expense up to $1.5 million of growth-enhancing investments, including in areas like software, patents, and machinery.

  • Reform economic immigration programs to expand pathways to permanent residence for temporary foreign workers and former international students through the Express Entry points system.

  • Build on the Economic Mobility Pathways Pilot and work with employers and communities across Canada to welcome 2,000 skilled refugees to fill labour shortages in in-demand sectors such as health care.

  • Establish a Trusted Employer system to streamline application process for Canadian companies hiring temporary foreign workers to fill labour shortages that cannot be filled by Canadian workers.

  • Grow and improve the Global Talent Stream program by simplifying permit renewals, upholding the 2-week processing time, and establishing an employer hotline, to allow Canadian companies to attract and hire highly skilled workers.

  • Continue to work with provinces, territories, and regulatory bodies to improve foreign credential recognition.

  • Introduce a new Labour Mobility Tax Credit to allow workers in the building and construction trades to deduct up to $4,000 in eligible travel and temporary relocation expenses giving them a tax credit of up to $600 a year.

  • Make it easier for women and vulnerable groups to access training by requiring businesses supported through the Sectoral Workforce Solutions Program to include wrap-around supports.

  • Introduce a Career Extension Tax Credit to help seniors who want to stay in the workforce, stay in the workforce.

  • Develop a sector-specific Agricultural Labour Strategy with employers and unions to address persistent labour shortages.

  • Continue to deliver on our $80 million investment to train workers for green jobs.

  • Buy back the Quebec Bridge

  • Move forward on legislation that will implement the Digital Charter, strengthen privacy protections for consumers, and provide a clear set of rules that ensure fair competition in the online marketplace.

  • Reform the Scientific Research and Experimental Development Program to reduce red tape and the need for consultants, better align eligible expenses to today’s innovation and R&D and make the program more generous for those companies who take the biggest risks, promoting productivity, new inventions, and the creation of good jobs.

  • Add 1,000 Canada Research Chairs to help attract and retain top talent at Canadian universities and support graduate research, with a focus on improving gender and racial equity among Canadian faculty, promoting inter-disciplinary research, and reinforcing Canada’s world leading capabilities in life sciences and bio-medical research.

  • Establish a $75 million a year fund for colleges and universities to help commercialize leading research, including identifying and securing patent rights for research done within their institutions and connecting researchers with people and businesses to help put these innovations into action and grow our economy.

  • Introduce a new $100 million a year fund to pursue moonshot research into high-impact illnesses where a vaccine may be possible.

  • Move forward with our plan to invest in the Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy, supporting artificial intelligence innovations and research in Canada

  • Move forward with a National Quantum Strategy that will amplify Canada’s significant strength in quantum research, and grow our quantum-ready technologies, companies, and talent.

  • Move forward with our plan to invest in the National Research Council’s Canadian Photonics Fabrication Centre and reinforce Canada’s leadership in photonics research, testing, and prototyping done by academics and other innovative businesses.

  • Establish a Canada Advanced Research Projects Agency (CARPA) as a public-private bridge for research that helps develop and maintain Canadian-led technology and capabilities in high-impact areas.

  • Launch a new Arts and Culture Recovery Program that will match ticket sales for performing arts, live theatres, and other cultural venues to compensate for reduced capacity.

  • Extend COVID-related insurance coverage for media production stoppages to support 150,000 Canadian jobs

  • Implement a COVID-19 transitional support program to provide emergency relief to out-of-work artists, craftspeople, creators, and authors who are primarily self-employed or independent contractors.

  • Ensure the realities of artists and cultural workers are considered in upcoming reforms to the Employment Insurance (EI) system.

  • Protect Canadian artists, creators, and copyright holders by making changes to the Copyright Act, including amending the Act to allow resale rights for artists.

  • Within the first 100 days, reintroduce legislation to reform the Broadcasting Act to ensure foreign web giants contribute to the creation and promotion of Canadian stories and music.

  • Modernize the institutions (Telefilm, National Film Board, Canada Media Fund) and funding tools that support Canada’s audio-visual sector, including video games, in order to make funding platform-agnostic and open to more traditionally underrepresented storytellers, while favouring Canadian productions over foreign ones and ensuring that Canadians are better equipped to own and benefit from the content that they produce.

  • Support Canadian feature films by permanently increasing funding to Telefilm Canada by $50 million.

  • Support Canadian television productions by doubling the government contribution, over three years, to the Canada Media Fund.

  • Increase the proportion of funding for French audiovisual content at Telefilm and the Canada Media Fund from 33% to 40% to support a better presence of French-language productions

  • Ensure better and stable funding for the music sector by increasing the annual contribution to the Canada Music Fund to $50 million by 2024-2025.

  • Provide the Indigenous Screen Office with $13 million per year, permanently, so more Indigenous stories can be told and seen.

  • Help Canadian cultural industries succeed abroad by issuing a mandate to BDC and EDC to support the growth of creative industries in new markets.

  • Launch a new cultural diplomacy strategy with an annual budget of $20 million per year to leverage the work done by our artists and cultural industries to support Canada’s diplomatic goals

  • Forge an international coalition to work on a new UNESCO Convention on the Diversity of Cultural Content Online.

  • Celebrate Canada’s unique francophone cultures through the promotion of the French language across our diplomatic missions and in our work to transform the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

  • Invest $43 million per year to support Canadian authors and books publishers by increasing, by 50%, funding for through the Canada Book Fund, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Public Lending Right Program.

  • Introduce legislation, within 100 days, that would require digital platforms that generate revenues from the publication of news content to share a portion of their revenues with Canadian news outlets.,

  • Update CBC/Radio-Canada’s mandate to ensure that it is meeting the needs and expectation of today’s Canadian audiences, with a unique programming that distinguishes it from private broadcasters.

  • Reaffirm the role of the public broadcaster in protecting and promoting the French language and Francophone cultures in Quebec and across the country.

  • Increase production of national, regional, and local news.

  • Strengthen Radio Canada International, our voice for peace, democracy, and universal human values on the world stage

  • Ensure that Indigenous voices and cultures are present on our screens and radios.

  • Bring Canada’s TV and film productions to the world stage,

  • Provide $400 million over 4 years to CBC/Radio-Canada so that it is less reliant on private advertising with a goal of eliminating advertising during news and other public affairs shows

  • Require those that have purchased the rights to build broadband actually do so. With this use it or lose it approach, Canada’s large national carriers will be required to accelerate the roll-out of wireless and high-speed internet in rural and northern Canada by progressively meeting broadband access milestones between now and 2025. If these milestones are not met, we will mandate the resale of spectrum rights and reallocate that capacity to smaller, regional providers.

  • Continue to strengthen Canada’s Regional Development Agencies, so that rural and small communities have the support they need right where they are

  • Expand the number of family doctors and primary health teams in rural communities.

  • Work to give rural communities greater access to a full suite of health and social services professionals, including dentists, pharmacists, dental hygienists, midwives, social workers, psychologists, teachers, and early childhood educators

  • Help health care professionals set up new practices

  • Work with supply-managed sectors to determine compensation within the first year of a new mandate.

  • Require financial institutions offer flexible repayment options by default if you fall on hard times or face a life event that causes financial stress. This will include a mandatory option for a 6-month deferral of mortgage payments in qualifying circumstances.

  • Establish a single, independent ombudsperson for handling consumer complaints involving banks, with the power to impose binding arbitration.

  • Crack down on predatory lenders by lowering the criminal rate of interest

  • Enhance the powers of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada to review the prices charged by banks and impose changes if they are excessive.

  • Move forward with a made-in-Canada model of open banking that will launch no later than the beginning of 2023

  • Modernize Canada’s payments technology to deliver faster and lower cost options so that you can securely and conveniently manage money, pay bills, and transfer funds to loved ones around the world.



  • Canada Job Surge Plan: paying up to 50% of the salary of new hires for six months following the end of CEWS.

  • Introduce a Dine and Discover Program that will provide a 50% rebate for food and non-alcoholic drinks purchased for dine-in from Monday to Wednesday for one month once it is safe to do so, pumping nearly $1 billion into the hospitality and tourism industry.

  • Canada Investment Accelerator: getting companies spending money and creating jobs by providing a 5% investment tax credit for any capital investment made in 2022 and 2023, with the first $25,000 to be refundable for small business.

  • Rebuild Main Street Tax Credit: providing a 25% tax credit on amounts of up to $100,000 that Canadians personally invest in a small business over the next two years, to get money flowing into main street businesses and create jobs.

  • Main Street Business Loan: providing loans of up to $200,000 to help small and medium businesses in hospitality, retail, and tourism get back on their feet, with up to 25% forgiven.

  • Launch the Explore and Support Canada initiative with a 15% tax credit for vacation expenses of up to $1,000 per person for Canadians to vacation in Canada in 2022, helping our tourism sector get back on its feet.

  • Eliminate the escalator tax on alcohol

  • Help the airline sector rebuild on the condition airlines agree to provide refunds to customers whose flights they cancelled, end layoffs, restore regional routes, allow travel agents to maintain commissions collected for cancelled travel, and ban executive bonuses until the support is repaid.

  • Pass legislation implementing strong protection of passengers’ rights based on the EU system. Among other things, this will make it clear that passengers are entitled to full refunds - not vouchers - when an airline cancels a flight and doesn’t offer an alternative.

  • Increase the disbursement quota for charitable foundations to 7.5%

  • Reform BDC to ensure that its loan programs are accessible to small businesses.

  • Look for ways to make it easier to start a business

  • Fix the mortgage stress test to stop discriminating against small business owners, contractors and other non-permanent employees including casual workers.

  • Strengthen the Code of Conduct to better protect consumers and small businesses from fraud and things like unwarranted chargebacks that can be devastating for them.

  • Make the Taxpayer Ombudsman an officer of Parliament with order-making authority

  • Measure and report on the tax gap, in detail, by type of taxation and reason for the shortfall (similar to the UK model) so that CRA resources can be allocated where the problems exist

  • Impose a duty of care (a legal obligation to a reasonable standard) on CRA

  • Launch a comprehensive review of Canada’s tax system to improve competitiveness, bring down rates and simplify the rules

  • Revise CRA’s penalties so that first-time problems or errors receive only minor fines, with increasing severity for repeat offenders

  • Create a “welcome to CRA” program and materials for new small businesses

  • Allow businesses with less than $60,000 in revenues to use simple cash accounting

  • Appoint a Minister Responsible for Red Tape Reduction tasked with introducing and passing at least one red tape reduction bill per year, eliminating unneeded or counterproductive red tape.

  • Create an Office of Regulatory Best Practice with business members who evaluate the costs of new regulation

  • Form Industry Councils (biotech, retail, etc.) that will provide recommendations on world-leading regulation

  • Improving cost-benefit analysis of regulatory proposals by requiring consultation with industry

  • Fix the Impact Assessment process that is making it impossible to build major projects in Canada

  • Create a Fast Track Certification Process that provides a faster path to approval for products that have already been approved in comparable jurisdictions

  • Appoint an expert panel tasked with reviewing the tax system and making recommendations to make it simpler and fairer

  • Break down interprovincial trade barriers

  • Scrap the failed Canada Infrastructure Bank and commit the money sitting unused on its books to infrastructure projects that can strengthen our economy

  • Reprioritize the Investing in Canada Plan towards infrastructure projects that would have the maximum benefit for economic recovery

  • Build digital infrastructure to connect all of Canada to High-Speed Internet by 2025

  • Accelerate the plan to get rural broadband built

  • Continue building the Trans-Canada Trail by providing $12.5 million per year in funding

  • Invest $5 billion over the next five years to fund programs aimed at making major advances in: Use of hydrogen; Small Modular Reactors; Private sector innovation in the space sector; Electric vehicle development and manufacturing; and Pharmaceutical research and production

  • Introduce a “patent box” regime to cut the tax rate in half on income earned from patents on innovative products developed here.

  • Cover up to $10,000 of the administrative and legal costs of each of the first five patents filed by any Canadian small or medium-sized business.

  • Streamline and accelerate the SR&ED program

  • Review all innovation programs at ISED and across the government to ensure they are as simple as possible, to remove duplication, and to ensure that all innovation spending benefits Canada

  • Introduce the use of flow-through shares for tech companies

  • Exempt Canadian-controlled start-ups headquartered and with at least 2/3 of their employees in Canada from the current plan to tax stock options.

  • Create a tax credit for buying from a Canadian start-up

  • Direct the Canadian government to finally start buying from innovative Canadian start-ups

  • Reform Canada’s procurement rules to create a vital national interest category that must be sourced in Canada

  • Create a strategy to repatriate and diversify supply chains to move them away from China.

  • Protect Canadian intellectual property with a strengthened Investment Canada Act

  • Withdraw from the Asian Infrastructure and Investment Bank

  • Pursue a Canada-Australia-New Zealand-United Kingdom (“CANZUK”) agreement

  • Build deeper ties with India as part of an Indo-Pacific strategy

  • Leverage Canadian leadership in fintech by working to remove barriers for Canadian firms, provide Canadian regulatory expertise and best practices, support cooperation against illicit finance, and promote financial inclusion in developing regions

  • Seek to enlarge the CPTPP deal and pursue setting rules for digital trade through the CPTPP

  • Advocate for the speedy conclusion of the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA).

  • Pursue a partnership with Africa’s Continental Free Trade in infrastructure, energy, and technology.

  • Launch a historic trade promotion effort connecting all aspects of Canadian industries with international opportunities

  • Animate the full potential of the Canada-UK trade deal

  • Establish a trade accelerator connecting all sectors of the Canadian economy with EU commercial opportunities

  • Assist Canada’s nuclear industry with pursuing sales of Canadian nuclear technology to help other countries reduce their GHG emissions

  • Bring manufacturing of critical equipment like PPE and pharmaceuticals back to Canada by ensuring that government and government-funded procurement of these essential products favours Canadian producers

  • Rebuild our domestic vaccine manufacturing capacity

  • Identify our key defence industry capabilities and invest in them

  • Re-evaluate the risk management measures in defence contracts that shift risk and therefore control to contractors at the expense of selecting Canadian components

  • Increase employee ownership of Canadian companies by establishing Employee Ownership Trusts, which provide a tax advantage for company owners to sell to their employees. This will take the form of a reduction in capital gains tax when the owner sells to a trust owned by the employees, enabling ownership to transfer to the people who have partnered in building the business.

  • Change legislation to ensure that pensioners have priority over corporate elites in bankruptcy or restructuring

  • Prevent executives from paying themselves bonuses while managing a company going through restructuring if the pension plan is not fully funded

  • No longer force underfunded pension plans from being converted to annuities, something that currently locks in losses and results in workers getting less money

  • Require companies to report the funding status of their pension plans more clearly


  • Supports like paid sick leave and prescription drug coverage

  • Put people to work building up our communities with energy-efficient retrofits and affordable homes

  • Help Canadian workers make more products here at home

  • Create a low income supplement so that no one who is relying on EI regular or special benefits to stay afloat receives less than $2,000 a month.

  • Make EI available to people who quit their jobs to go back to school, to provide necessary childcare, or to protect their health or the health of immunocompromised family members.

  • Extend sickness benefits from 15 to 50 weeks, and create a pilot project to allow workers with episodic illnesses and disabilities to access EI sickness benefits a day at a time, as they need them

  • Bring back the former Extra Five Weeks pilot project and make it permanent, and restore the economic regions in the territories and PEI to their 2014 boundaries.

  • Bring in a new special leave that allows parents to take shorter parental leave at a higher replacement rate

  • Allow self-employed workers to opt-into parental benefits at any time before taking the leave, and move to double leave for parents of multiples.

  • Protect the EI Operating Account in law, so that future governments can’t raid it for general revenue. Premiums, which are currently at a historic low, will be frozen until the economy recovers.

  • Build towards a guaranteed livable income for all Canadians.

  • Lift every senior and person living with a disability out of poverty, and build from there until every Canadian can count on a basic livable income when they need it,

  • Expand all income security programs to ensure everyone in Canada has access to a guaranteed livable basic income.

  • Affordable child care you need, when you need it, with a licensed provider making a fair wage

  • Work with the provinces to build a universal, $10 a day childcare system that’s there for all parents, no matter where you live

  • Defend the Rand formula, so that unions can effectively advocate for workers, and continue to oppose heavy-handed legislation that suspends the rights to bargain and to strike.

  • Make sure that workers and employers can take action together to improve health and safety, eliminating unsafe working conditions and ensuring that whistleblowers are protected.

  • Update the Canada Labour Code to enhance safeguards for workers so that everyone can stay safe and healthy at work

  • Update federal standards and bring in a permanent safety net of paid sick leave across the country

  • Allow sick leave to be taken by workers one or two days at a time, give full income replacement to workers who are sick, and reimburse employers instead of putting the onus on workers to apply for the program

  • Move immediately to legislate 10 paid sick days in the Canada Labour Code for federally regulated workplaces.

  • Prioritize anti-scab legislation that will ban the use of replacement workers in labour disputes – for good.

  • Put in place a living federal minimum wage starting at $15 an hour and rising to $20 an hour, indexed to the cost of living.

  • Put in place rules to require that part-time and contract workers be compensated equally to full-time workers.

  • Immediately ban unpaid internships outside of education programs.

  • Replace the failed Phoenix pay system

  • Work to reduce the inefficient and costly practice of contracting out government work

  • Work with the provinces to ensure that Canadians have access to education throughout their professional lives, including proactive training and retraining, as well as support when they are unemployed.

  • Change EI rules to allow workers who quit their job to go to school to qualify for EI benefits

  • Expand options for workers in designated sectors and regions to take EI funded training in advance of losing a job

  • Require large employers to spend at least 1 percent of payroll on training for their employees annually.

  • Expand training options beyond people who qualify for EI

  • Make sure that small businesses wage and rent subsidies continue until small businesses are able to fully reopen.

  • Put in place a long-term hiring bonus to pay the employer portion of EI and CPP for new or rehired staff.

  • Put an end to gouging by capping high credit card merchant fees at a maximum of 1%.

  • Streamline access to government export services and make it simpler to break into foreign markets

  • Provide small- and medium-sized businesses with a single point of contact to help ease regulatory processes and support compliance

  • Make important new investments in training Canadians and boost support to traditionally underemployed groups

  • Defend Canadian workers in trade negotiations, protect supply management, stand up against unfair tariffs.

  • Improve the transparency of trade negotiations, so that Canadians can clearly understand the costs and benefits of any proposed agreement and have their say before it’s signed.

  • Protect Canadians against measures that could increase the cost of pharmaceuticals, weaken our cultural protections, or undermine privacy rights

  • Protect Canadian businesses who are taking action to transition to a low-carbon future with a border carbon adjustment that will level the playing field on imports from areas without a carbon price

  • Defend Canadian workers and communities from unfair trading practices

  • Develop comprehensive industrial strategies to incubate and expand critical domestic manufacturing capacity and supply chain infrastructure

  • Scrap the failed Invest in Canada agency and create iCanada, a one-stop shop inside the federal government to help attract investors to Canada and turn their plans into reality,

  • Convene an auto summit with provincial, municipal, industry and labour leaders to develop a consensus on a National Automotive Strategy to attract and retain jobs and investment.

  • Make sure that Canadian product lines and manufacturing processes are adapted to meet changing consumer needs and evolving realities in the manufacturing industry

  • Restore the Automotive Innovation Fund and make contributions to automakers tax-free to help secure next generation production capacity.

  • Drive demand by ensuring that federal incentives for zero-emissions automobiles prioritize made-in-Canada vehicles.

  • Develop a national industrial strategy to build an advanced low carbon manufacturing economy in Canada that will provide good middle-class jobs to Canadian workers

  • Grow the domestic market for Canadian manufactured goods, and provide strategic supports to our long-neglected steel and aluminum industries to attract and retain jobs and investments in communities across the country

  • Adopt measures to stabilize the Canadian steel market, and protect the sector from predatory practices of foreign producers who are shut out of other markets.

  • Require the use of Canadian-made steel and aluminum for infrastructure projects across the country,

  • Foster entrepreneurship, including through dedicated support to get the hard-hit tourism sector back on its feet.

  • Help launch a Canadian start-up culture, with a focus on helping Canadian companies in all regions of the country commercialize new technologies and scaleup, train and retain the highly-skilled Canadian workforce needed to support industry growth

  • Plan for a Canadian Food Strategy that will take a whole-of-government approach to address regional needs and priorities by investing in our agricultural communities, supporting young and new farmers and taking steps to ensure that rural livelihoods are good and sustainable.

  • Fully protect supply management and ensure reciprocity in all trade negotiations, and support our supply managed sectors as they innovate and grow.

  • Make sure that high-speed broadband and cell phone infrastructure is available to connect our farmers and rural communities to the services and tools they need, no matter where in the country they are.

  • Introduce a payment protection program for produce growers and take immediate steps to restore protection for growers selling to the United States under the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act.,

  • Invest in forestry innovation and support value-added Canadian wood products,

  • Fully implement the recommendations of the Cohen Commission and work with the province of British Columbia and First Nations to support the transition to land-based closed-containment systems

  • Ensure that resource allocations in the fishery are guided by the principles of adjacency, historic dependence and sustainability, while also respecting Indigenous rights.

  • Invest in habitat restoration and the rebuilding of fish stocks, as well as in strengthening our response to oil spills and derelict vessels to better protect our coasts

  • Raise revenues through new, fair and progressive taxation sources

  • Introduce a temporary COVID-19 excess profit tax that puts an additional 15% tax on large corporate windfall profits during the pandemic/

  • Increase the capital gains inclusion rate to 75 percent

  • Boost the top marginal tax rate two points, put in place a luxury goods tax on things like yachts and private jets, and ask the very richest multi-millionaires to pay a bit more towards our shared services with a wealth tax

  • Roll back corporate income tax cuts by three percentage points to 2010 levels

  • Ensure that internet giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon pay their fair share of taxes

  • Close loopholes that include eliminating bearer shares, compelling companies to prove the economic reason for their offshore transactions, and improving transparency on the taxes paid by large corporations

  • Boost compliance funding to Canada Revenue Agency’s enforcement section dealing with international and corporate taxation, to ensure that companies can’t evade new measures


  • Suspend the ERCP, while ensuring that it can be reactivated depending on the intensity of future waves and that it remains in effect for carefully targeted sectors and job categories where recovery remains slow, such as the cultural sector or aerospace

  • Propose measures to encourage the work of seniors with their invaluable expertise, by allowing low-income seniors to work more without penalty and by involving Aboriginal nations, in addition to encouraging the settlement of newcomers and graduates in the regions.

  • Propose changes to business assistance programs to ensure the vitality of all our SME models.

  • Repatriate all powers in the area of culture and create a Quebec agency to replace the CRTC, because we do not entrust our culture to the neighbouring nation.

  • Tax the revenues of digital giants at a rate of 3%, as France already does.

  • Force the Web multinationals to negotiate with Quebec and Canadian content creators in order to establish a fair sharing of revenues.

  • Demand that the money collected in taxes from the digital giants be redirected to a fund dedicated to Quebec's arts and culture as well as to our media.

  • Put an end to tax avoidance by large corporations in tax havens

  • Create a special additional tax on large fortunes.

  • The Bloc Québécois will reintroduce a bill giving Quebec an automatic right of compensation with full restitution when Ottawa creates federal programs in Quebec's exclusive jurisdiction, or seeks to attach conditions to these transfers of money.

  • Pursue a policy of economic nationalism in a perspective of resilience and autonomy, in order to ensure the maintenance and development of our businesses.

  • Tighten controls on foreign investments to better protect the flagships of our economy from takeovers

  • Abandon the project to concentrate the supervision of the financial sector in Toronto, which is essential to maintaining Montreal's financial centre and preserving the head offices that depend on it

  • Develop a procurement policy that favours small and medium-sized businesses and takes into account the environmental impacts of government purchases

  • Developing an industrial strategy that favours a certain degree of self-sufficiency in essential and strategic areas.

  • Negotiate an exemption to the Buy America Act for Canadian companies in the field of green energy and low carbon technologies.

  • Stand up to the United States in any trade dispute involving our agriculture, softwood lumber, aluminum or any other undue burden on the Quebec economy

  • Reintroduce legislation to fully protect supply management in future free trade agreements.

  • Address the issue of increasing slaughter capacity, where market concentration and current policy loopholes result in endless animal trips, sometimes euthanasia, and food waste.

  • Recognize the multifunctionality of farmers in its financial support so as to recognize the contribution of small producers

  • Ensure that farmers and processors are fully compensated for the supply management loopholes in the free trade agreements with Europe, the Pacific Rim and North America.

  • Propose to encourage small Quebec distillers in all regions and their unique products, by reducing the excise tax on alcohol according to the volume of production of the companies, inspired by what Quebec offers to microbreweries.

  • Insist on substantial industrial spinoffs from military procurement; predictable and sustainable support for research and development to design and build tomorrow's fuel-efficient aircraft in Canada and to develop the aircraft recycling industry

  • Support for the 200 or so small and medium-sized aerospace companies to get through the current crisis in the aviation sector and to participate in development projects that will ensure the sector's long-term survival.

  • Plan to maximize the potential of Quebec's forests, with the goals and effects of local processing, the development of technological innovations and increased productivity in a context of labour shortage.

  • Reduce Quebec's vulnerability to trade treaties and decrease the pressure on the raw resource by increasing the diversity of jobs, particularly through processing and the creation of exportable green technologies.,

  • Finance a fund to support the transformation of Quebec aluminum in Quebec, in particular by reinvesting all the money collected in counter-tariffs in the free trade disputes with the United States in 2018-2019

  • The unconditional transfer to Quebec of all federal funds dedicated to infrastructure.

  • Support the Toronto-Quebec high frequency train via Trois-Rivières

  • Propose a plan to open up the regions, including support for a Quebec alternative to Air Canada outside the major centers, the obligation for Air Canada to offer acceptable services in the meantime, the upgrading of the rail network and the increase of VIA Rail services.

  • Demand that Ottawa finally move forward with the high frequency rail project

  • Decentralize the federal public service, which is largely concentrated in the Ottawa region, in order to create job centres in the regions.

  • Facilitate work in the regions through tax credits for graduates and immigrants who choose to settle outside the major centers.

  • Make the telework tax deduction introduced during the pandemic permanent.

  • Regionalize regional development programs by decentralizing Canada Economic Development and entrusting the funds to regional funds that will allow the regions to manage their priorities independently

  • Table a strategy to support local purchasing and local businesses, the face of our main streets and essential cogs in the regional economy.

  • Propose improved support for the digital transition of businesses, lower credit card fees for online transactions, and additional time to repay loans taken out during the pandemic without penalty.

  • A complete revision of the naval strategy in order to arrive at a new plan that will include Davie Shipyard as a partner commensurate with its production capacity.


  • Create a comprehensive and equitable Guaranteed Livable Income for every person in Canada

  • Apply a corporate tax on transnational e-commerce companies doing business in Canada by requiring the foreign vendor to register, collect and remit taxes where the product or service is consumed

  • Impose a financial transactions tax of 0.5 per cent in the finance sector as France has done since 2012

  • Increase the federal corporate tax rate from 15 to 21 per cent to bring it into line with the federal rate in the United States, our biggest trading partner.

  • Charge a five per cent surtax on commercial bank profits.

  • Work with our international partners to implement a global minimum tax

  • Prohibit Canadian businesses from deducting the cost of advertising on foreign-owned sites such as Google and Facebook which now account for 80 per cent of all spending on advertising Canada

  • Eliminate the 50 per cent corporate meals and entertainment expense deduction, which includes season tickets and private boxes at sporting events.

  • Apply a one per cent tax on net (family) wealth above $20 million

  • Close stock options tax loopholes that benefit the wealthy

  • Close capital gains tax loopholes.

  • End offshore tax evasion by taxing funds hidden in offshore havens and requiring companies to prove that their foreign affiliates are actual functioning businesses for tax purposes

  • Focus the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) on identifying people who hide vast wealth, rather than conduct random audits of ordinary Canadians, as recommended by several Auditor Generals.

  • Provide adequate funding to the CRA to collect tax revenue hiding in offshore tax havens

  • Apply a tax on luxury goods, such as planes, and luxury cars

  • Create an “empty home” tax for foreign and corporate residential property owners who leave buildings and units vacant

  • Close tax haven loopholes that allow foreign investors to hide the names of beneficial owners of properties in Canada

  • Establish an arm’s length Federal Tax Commission to analyze the tax system for fairness and accessibility, based on the principle of progressive taxation

  • Eliminate all fossil fuel subsidies, including payments and tax write-offs, valued at several billion dollars annually

  • Ensure access to strong internet connection by investing in broadband connectivity

  • Invest in inter-municipal and rural public transit infrastructure such as buses and railway systems

  • Work with provinces to offer preferential tariffs for youth using public transit systems

  • Support the development of educational programs targeting sustainable degrees for rural/small-urban developments

  • Open the path for more apprentice programs and local post-secondary branches with online training for the time being and support towards the co-op model

  • Develop a new working model that will allow for more young people to work remotely from home if it is their preference

  • Help youth looking to move into rural areas have access to land, property for sustainable farming

  • Shift the direction of international trade away from “free trade” to “fair trade” in order to prioritize the protection of human rights, labour standards, cultural diversity, and ecosystems around the world.

  • Support global calls for the reform of the World Trade Organization to ensure more equitable international mechanisms that can effectively tackle the ongoing pandemic and climate crisis.

  • Strengthen the mandate and tools available to the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise (CORE) to independently investigate Canadian companies operating abroad and report publicly on its findings

  • Cease all federal support to Canadian exporters of arms and fossil fuels, with the exception of potential necessary sales of peacekeeping equipment in cooperation with the United Nations.

  • Develop and implement carbon border adjustments to ensure Canadian businesses do not face unfair competition from polluting jurisdictions

  • Lead international discussions to reform TRIPS (The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) to ensure that intellectual property rights are not barriers to the achievement and furtherance of international human rights and clean development.

  • Remove the current model of Investor State Dispute Settlement mechanisms (ISDS) in all existing trade agreements and prohibit its use in any new agreements.

  • Mandate and equip Canadian missions abroad to expand partnerships among civil society organizations centred on the promotion of human rights, resilience, scientific cooperation and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.


  • Counter anti-oil and anti-pipeline propaganda from radical environmentalists and foreign foundations.

  • Repeal Bill C-48

  • Repeal Bill C-69.

  • Approve pipelines projects using a streamlined process.

  • Find a private buyer for Trans Mountain.

  • Reassert federal jurisdiction over pipelines construction by invoking section 92(10) of our Constitution, whereby Parliament can declare any project to be for the general advantage of Canada.

  • Work with industry and with our American partners to possibly revive cancelled projects and keep Line 5 in operation.

  • Reassert the authority and leadership of the federal government on internal trade.

  • Use section 91(2) of the Constitution, which gives Ottawa exclusive power to regulate matters of international and interprovincial trade, to force provinces to apply the principle of mutual recognition where applicable.

  • Appoint a Minister of Internal Trade whose sole responsibility will be to conduct studies, raise public awareness, counteract the influence of special interests that benefit from interprovincial barriers, and put pressure on provincial governments to get rid of them.

  • Reduce the total amount of equalization payments to provinces, and make sure that only the provinces with the greatest needs benefit from it.

  • Establish a parliamentary committee to review and make recommendations on a new formula that will avoid the welfare trap and provide poorer provinces with the right incentives to adopt pro-growth economic policies and reduce their dependence on federal money.

  • Ensure that the new formula respects our Constitution, makes provincial governments more responsible for their policy decisions, and is fair for citizens of all provinces.

  • Eliminate all corporate subsidies and other inefficient government interventions (bailouts of failing companies, regional development grants, conditional loans and loan guarantees with an implicit subsidy, tax credits, etc.) that unfairly support some companies or business sectors. This will generate savings of between $5 billion and $10 billion a year.

  • Gradually reduce over the course of one mandate the corporate income tax rate from its current 15% down to 10%. When completed, this measure will make about $9.5 billion available to businesses, allowing them to increase salaries or invest in productivity improvements.

  • Over the course of one mandate, gradually abolish the personal capital gains tax by decreasing the inclusion rate from the current 50% down to 0%. When completed, this measure will put about $7 billion per year back into the pockets of Canadians.

  • Phase out all covid spending programs and reverse new spending programs announced by the Trudeau government.,

  • Get rid of the deficit by the end of a first mandate through fiscal prudence and spending cuts, including corporate welfare ($5B-$10B), foreign development aid ($5B), CBC ($1B), equalization payments, and funding for programs which are provincial or municipal responsibilities.

  • Eliminate targeted tax measures that are inefficient and serve no compelling public policy purpose.

  • Cut personal income taxes, corporate taxes, and the personal capital gains tax after the deficit has been eliminated, over the course of several budgets, as the fiscal room is found to allow it.

  • Phase out the supply management system over a number of years to allow farmers to adapt, and compensate them for the lost value of their quotas.

  • Create a free, open, and fair system that will save Canadians billions of dollars annually thanks to the lower prices they will pay for these products.

  • Allow Canada’s dairy, egg and poultry farmers to thrive and sell their products internationally.


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  • Restore employment to pre-pandemic levels—going beyond one million jobs—and ensure that the jobs that are created are good, well-paying jobs

  • Continue to expand the Canada Workers Benefit to support about 1 million additional Canadians in low-wage jobs, helping them return to work and increasing benefits for Canada’s most vulnerable, who will be eligible for up to $1,400 a year.

  • Continue to ensure that secondary earners—mostly women—can exclude up to $14,000 of their working income when income-testing the Canada Workers Benefit, so that families can receive up to $2,400.

  • Introduce a new EI benefit for self-employed Canadians, delivered through the tax system, that would provide unemployment assistance comparable to EI and lasting for as much as 26 weeks. This could provide support of nearly $15,500 when it is needed most.

  • Self-employed Canadians seeking to access this benefit would only be responsible to contribute the portion they would normally pay if they were a salaried employee

  • Strengthen rights for workers employed by digital platforms so that they are entitled to job protections under the Canada Labour Code and establish new provisions in the Income Tax Act to ensure this work counts toward EI and CPP while also making these platforms pay associated contributions as any employer would.

  • Move forward with a stronger and more inclusive EI system that addresses gaps made obvious during COVID-19.

  • Establish an EI Career Insurance Benefit. This benefit will be available to people who have worked continuously for the same employer for five or more years and are laid off when the business closes. The Career Insurance Benefit will kick in after regular EI ends, providing an additional 20% of insured earnings in the first year following the layoff, and an extra 10% in the second year. This will give workers up to an almost $16,900 over two years, providing significant help at a difficult time.

  • Extend the Home Expense deduction for an additional 2 years, through the 2022 tax year, and increase the deductible amount to $500

  • Provide up to 5 new paid leave days for federally regulated employees who experience a miscarriage or stillbirth, which can happen in up to 1 in 5 pregnancies.

  • Strengthen provisions in the Canada Labour Code to better support women that need to be temporarily re-assigned to other duties during pregnancy and while breast-feeding.

  • Create a fairer collective bargaining process by introducing legislation to prohibit the use of replacement workers, “scabs,” when a union employer in a federally regulated industry has locked out employees.

  • Work with federally regulated employers and labour groups to co-develop a new policy for the right to disconnect so that workers can disconnect at the end of a workday without worrying about job security and restore healthy work-life balance.

  • Protect public post-secondary educational institutions, such as Laurentian University, from being subject to corporate restructuring.

  • Double the Union Training and Innovation program to $50 million a year to support more apprenticeship training opportunities and additional partnerships in the Red Seal trades across Canada, and target more participation from women, Indigenous people, newcomers, persons with disabilities, and Black and racialized Canadians

  • Move forward on our plan to establish a new Apprenticeship Service which will connect 55,000 first-year apprentices in Red Seal trades with opportunities at small and medium-sized employers.

  • Extend the Canada Recovery Hiring Program to March 31, 2022, so businesses can hire more workers and Canadians can get back on the job.

  • Provide Canada’s hard-hit tourism industry with temporary wage and rent support of up to 75% of their expenses to help them get through the winter

  • Give microgrants of up to $2,400 to smaller Main Street businesses so they can afford the costs of new technology

  • Create training and work opportunities for as many as 28,000 young people so they can assist small and medium-sized businesses in adopting new technology.

  • Offer zero-interest loans to small and medium-sized businesses so they can finance larger technology adoption projects.

  • increase annual financing for the Canada Small Business Financing Program by an estimated $560 million, supporting approximately 2,900 additional small businesses.

  • Keep moving forward with our plan to boost business investment by allowing privately owned, Canadian-controlled businesses to immediately expense up to $1.5 million of growth-enhancing investments, including in areas like software, patents, and machinery.

  • Reform economic immigration programs to expand pathways to permanent residence for temporary foreign workers and former international students through the Express Entry points system.

  • Build on the Economic Mobility Pathways Pilot and work with employers and communities across Canada to welcome 2,000 skilled refugees to fill labour shortages in in-demand sectors such as health care.

  • Establish a Trusted Employer system to streamline application process for Canadian companies hiring temporary foreign workers to fill labour shortages that cannot be filled by Canadian workers.

  • Grow and improve the Global Talent Stream program by simplifying permit renewals, upholding the 2-week processing time, and establishing an employer hotline, to allow Canadian companies to attract and hire highly skilled workers.

  • Continue to work with provinces, territories, and regulatory bodies to improve foreign credential recognition.

  • Introduce a new Labour Mobility Tax Credit to allow workers in the building and construction trades to deduct up to $4,000 in eligible travel and temporary relocation expenses giving them a tax credit of up to $600 a year.

  • Make it easier for women and vulnerable groups to access training by requiring businesses supported through the Sectoral Workforce Solutions Program to include wrap-around supports.

  • Introduce a Career Extension Tax Credit to help seniors who want to stay in the workforce, stay in the workforce.

  • Develop a sector-specific Agricultural Labour Strategy with employers and unions to address persistent labour shortages.

  • Continue to deliver on our $80 million investment to train workers for green jobs.

  • Buy back the Quebec Bridge

  • Move forward on legislation that will implement the Digital Charter, strengthen privacy protections for consumers, and provide a clear set of rules that ensure fair competition in the online marketplace.

  • Reform the Scientific Research and Experimental Development Program to reduce red tape and the need for consultants, better align eligible expenses to today’s innovation and R&D and make the program more generous for those companies who take the biggest risks, promoting productivity, new inventions, and the creation of good jobs.

  • Add 1,000 Canada Research Chairs to help attract and retain top talent at Canadian universities and support graduate research, with a focus on improving gender and racial equity among Canadian faculty, promoting inter-disciplinary research, and reinforcing Canada’s world leading capabilities in life sciences and bio-medical research.

  • Establish a $75 million a year fund for colleges and universities to help commercialize leading research, including identifying and securing patent rights for research done within their institutions and connecting researchers with people and businesses to help put these innovations into action and grow our economy.

  • Introduce a new $100 million a year fund to pursue moonshot research into high-impact illnesses where a vaccine may be possible.

  • Move forward with our plan to invest in the Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy, supporting artificial intelligence innovations and research in Canada

  • Move forward with a National Quantum Strategy that will amplify Canada’s significant strength in quantum research, and grow our quantum-ready technologies, companies, and talent.

  • Move forward with our plan to invest in the National Research Council’s Canadian Photonics Fabrication Centre and reinforce Canada’s leadership in photonics research, testing, and prototyping done by academics and other innovative businesses.

  • Establish a Canada Advanced Research Projects Agency (CARPA) as a public-private bridge for research that helps develop and maintain Canadian-led technology and capabilities in high-impact areas.

  • Launch a new Arts and Culture Recovery Program that will match ticket sales for performing arts, live theatres, and other cultural venues to compensate for reduced capacity.

  • Extend COVID-related insurance coverage for media production stoppages to support 150,000 Canadian jobs

  • Implement a COVID-19 transitional support program to provide emergency relief to out-of-work artists, craftspeople, creators, and authors who are primarily self-employed or independent contractors.

  • Ensure the realities of artists and cultural workers are considered in upcoming reforms to the Employment Insurance (EI) system.

  • Protect Canadian artists, creators, and copyright holders by making changes to the Copyright Act, including amending the Act to allow resale rights for artists.

  • Within the first 100 days, reintroduce legislation to reform the Broadcasting Act to ensure foreign web giants contribute to the creation and promotion of Canadian stories and music.

  • Modernize the institutions (Telefilm, National Film Board, Canada Media Fund) and funding tools that support Canada’s audio-visual sector, including video games, in order to make funding platform-agnostic and open to more traditionally underrepresented storytellers, while favouring Canadian productions over foreign ones and ensuring that Canadians are better equipped to own and benefit from the content that they produce.

  • Support Canadian feature films by permanently increasing funding to Telefilm Canada by $50 million.

  • Support Canadian television productions by doubling the government contribution, over three years, to the Canada Media Fund.

  • Increase the proportion of funding for French audiovisual content at Telefilm and the Canada Media Fund from 33% to 40% to support a better presence of French-language productions

  • Ensure better and stable funding for the music sector by increasing the annual contribution to the Canada Music Fund to $50 million by 2024-2025.

  • Provide the Indigenous Screen Office with $13 million per year, permanently, so more Indigenous stories can be told and seen.

  • Help Canadian cultural industries succeed abroad by issuing a mandate to BDC and EDC to support the growth of creative industries in new markets.

  • Launch a new cultural diplomacy strategy with an annual budget of $20 million per year to leverage the work done by our artists and cultural industries to support Canada’s diplomatic goals

  • Forge an international coalition to work on a new UNESCO Convention on the Diversity of Cultural Content Online.

  • Celebrate Canada’s unique francophone cultures through the promotion of the French language across our diplomatic missions and in our work to transform the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

  • Invest $43 million per year to support Canadian authors and books publishers by increasing, by 50%, funding for through the Canada Book Fund, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Public Lending Right Program.

  • Introduce legislation, within 100 days, that would require digital platforms that generate revenues from the publication of news content to share a portion of their revenues with Canadian news outlets.,

  • Update CBC/Radio-Canada’s mandate to ensure that it is meeting the needs and expectation of today’s Canadian audiences, with a unique programming that distinguishes it from private broadcasters.

  • Reaffirm the role of the public broadcaster in protecting and promoting the French language and Francophone cultures in Quebec and across the country.

  • Increase production of national, regional, and local news.

  • Strengthen Radio Canada International, our voice for peace, democracy, and universal human values on the world stage

  • Ensure that Indigenous voices and cultures are present on our screens and radios.

  • Bring Canada’s TV and film productions to the world stage,

  • Provide $400 million over 4 years to CBC/Radio-Canada so that it is less reliant on private advertising with a goal of eliminating advertising during news and other public affairs shows

  • Require those that have purchased the rights to build broadband actually do so. With this use it or lose it approach, Canada’s large national carriers will be required to accelerate the roll-out of wireless and high-speed internet in rural and northern Canada by progressively meeting broadband access milestones between now and 2025. If these milestones are not met, we will mandate the resale of spectrum rights and reallocate that capacity to smaller, regional providers.

  • Continue to strengthen Canada’s Regional Development Agencies, so that rural and small communities have the support they need right where they are

  • Expand the number of family doctors and primary health teams in rural communities.

  • Work to give rural communities greater access to a full suite of health and social services professionals, including dentists, pharmacists, dental hygienists, midwives, social workers, psychologists, teachers, and early childhood educators

  • Help health care professionals set up new practices

  • Work with supply-managed sectors to determine compensation within the first year of a new mandate.

  • Require financial institutions offer flexible repayment options by default if you fall on hard times or face a life event that causes financial stress. This will include a mandatory option for a 6-month deferral of mortgage payments in qualifying circumstances.

  • Establish a single, independent ombudsperson for handling consumer complaints involving banks, with the power to impose binding arbitration.

  • Crack down on predatory lenders by lowering the criminal rate of interest

  • Enhance the powers of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada to review the prices charged by banks and impose changes if they are excessive.

  • Move forward with a made-in-Canada model of open banking that will launch no later than the beginning of 2023

  • Modernize Canada’s payments technology to deliver faster and lower cost options so that you can securely and conveniently manage money, pay bills, and transfer funds to loved ones around the world.



  • Canada Job Surge Plan: paying up to 50% of the salary of new hires for six months following the end of CEWS.

  • Introduce a Dine and Discover Program that will provide a 50% rebate for food and non-alcoholic drinks purchased for dine-in from Monday to Wednesday for one month once it is safe to do so, pumping nearly $1 billion into the hospitality and tourism industry.

  • Canada Investment Accelerator: getting companies spending money and creating jobs by providing a 5% investment tax credit for any capital investment made in 2022 and 2023, with the first $25,000 to be refundable for small business.

  • Rebuild Main Street Tax Credit: providing a 25% tax credit on amounts of up to $100,000 that Canadians personally invest in a small business over the next two years, to get money flowing into main street businesses and create jobs.

  • Main Street Business Loan: providing loans of up to $200,000 to help small and medium businesses in hospitality, retail, and tourism get back on their feet, with up to 25% forgiven.

  • Launch the Explore and Support Canada initiative with a 15% tax credit for vacation expenses of up to $1,000 per person for Canadians to vacation in Canada in 2022, helping our tourism sector get back on its feet.

  • Eliminate the escalator tax on alcohol

  • Help the airline sector rebuild on the condition airlines agree to provide refunds to customers whose flights they cancelled, end layoffs, restore regional routes, allow travel agents to maintain commissions collected for cancelled travel, and ban executive bonuses until the support is repaid.

  • Pass legislation implementing strong protection of passengers’ rights based on the EU system. Among other things, this will make it clear that passengers are entitled to full refunds - not vouchers - when an airline cancels a flight and doesn’t offer an alternative.

  • Increase the disbursement quota for charitable foundations to 7.5%

  • Reform BDC to ensure that its loan programs are accessible to small businesses.

  • Look for ways to make it easier to start a business

  • Fix the mortgage stress test to stop discriminating against small business owners, contractors and other non-permanent employees including casual workers.

  • Strengthen the Code of Conduct to better protect consumers and small businesses from fraud and things like unwarranted chargebacks that can be devastating for them.

  • Make the Taxpayer Ombudsman an officer of Parliament with order-making authority

  • Measure and report on the tax gap, in detail, by type of taxation and reason for the shortfall (similar to the UK model) so that CRA resources can be allocated where the problems exist

  • Impose a duty of care (a legal obligation to a reasonable standard) on CRA

  • Launch a comprehensive review of Canada’s tax system to improve competitiveness, bring down rates and simplify the rules

  • Revise CRA’s penalties so that first-time problems or errors receive only minor fines, with increasing severity for repeat offenders

  • Create a “welcome to CRA” program and materials for new small businesses

  • Allow businesses with less than $60,000 in revenues to use simple cash accounting

  • Appoint a Minister Responsible for Red Tape Reduction tasked with introducing and passing at least one red tape reduction bill per year, eliminating unneeded or counterproductive red tape.

  • Create an Office of Regulatory Best Practice with business members who evaluate the costs of new regulation

  • Form Industry Councils (biotech, retail, etc.) that will provide recommendations on world-leading regulation

  • Improving cost-benefit analysis of regulatory proposals by requiring consultation with industry

  • Fix the Impact Assessment process that is making it impossible to build major projects in Canada

  • Create a Fast Track Certification Process that provides a faster path to approval for products that have already been approved in comparable jurisdictions

  • Appoint an expert panel tasked with reviewing the tax system and making recommendations to make it simpler and fairer

  • Break down interprovincial trade barriers

  • Scrap the failed Canada Infrastructure Bank and commit the money sitting unused on its books to infrastructure projects that can strengthen our economy

  • Reprioritize the Investing in Canada Plan towards infrastructure projects that would have the maximum benefit for economic recovery

  • Build digital infrastructure to connect all of Canada to High-Speed Internet by 2025

  • Accelerate the plan to get rural broadband built

  • Continue building the Trans-Canada Trail by providing $12.5 million per year in funding

  • Invest $5 billion over the next five years to fund programs aimed at making major advances in: Use of hydrogen; Small Modular Reactors; Private sector innovation in the space sector; Electric vehicle development and manufacturing; and Pharmaceutical research and production

  • Introduce a “patent box” regime to cut the tax rate in half on income earned from patents on innovative products developed here.

  • Cover up to $10,000 of the administrative and legal costs of each of the first five patents filed by any Canadian small or medium-sized business.

  • Streamline and accelerate the SR&ED program

  • Review all innovation programs at ISED and across the government to ensure they are as simple as possible, to remove duplication, and to ensure that all innovation spending benefits Canada

  • Introduce the use of flow-through shares for tech companies

  • Exempt Canadian-controlled start-ups headquartered and with at least 2/3 of their employees in Canada from the current plan to tax stock options.

  • Create a tax credit for buying from a Canadian start-up

  • Direct the Canadian government to finally start buying from innovative Canadian start-ups

  • Reform Canada’s procurement rules to create a vital national interest category that must be sourced in Canada

  • Create a strategy to repatriate and diversify supply chains to move them away from China.

  • Protect Canadian intellectual property with a strengthened Investment Canada Act

  • Withdraw from the Asian Infrastructure and Investment Bank

  • Pursue a Canada-Australia-New Zealand-United Kingdom (“CANZUK”) agreement

  • Build deeper ties with India as part of an Indo-Pacific strategy

  • Leverage Canadian leadership in fintech by working to remove barriers for Canadian firms, provide Canadian regulatory expertise and best practices, support cooperation against illicit finance, and promote financial inclusion in developing regions

  • Seek to enlarge the CPTPP deal and pursue setting rules for digital trade through the CPTPP

  • Advocate for the speedy conclusion of the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA).

  • Pursue a partnership with Africa’s Continental Free Trade in infrastructure, energy, and technology.

  • Launch a historic trade promotion effort connecting all aspects of Canadian industries with international opportunities

  • Animate the full potential of the Canada-UK trade deal

  • Establish a trade accelerator connecting all sectors of the Canadian economy with EU commercial opportunities

  • Assist Canada’s nuclear industry with pursuing sales of Canadian nuclear technology to help other countries reduce their GHG emissions

  • Bring manufacturing of critical equipment like PPE and pharmaceuticals back to Canada by ensuring that government and government-funded procurement of these essential products favours Canadian producers

  • Rebuild our domestic vaccine manufacturing capacity

  • Identify our key defence industry capabilities and invest in them

  • Re-evaluate the risk management measures in defence contracts that shift risk and therefore control to contractors at the expense of selecting Canadian components

  • Increase employee ownership of Canadian companies by establishing Employee Ownership Trusts, which provide a tax advantage for company owners to sell to their employees. This will take the form of a reduction in capital gains tax when the owner sells to a trust owned by the employees, enabling ownership to transfer to the people who have partnered in building the business.

  • Change legislation to ensure that pensioners have priority over corporate elites in bankruptcy or restructuring

  • Prevent executives from paying themselves bonuses while managing a company going through restructuring if the pension plan is not fully funded

  • No longer force underfunded pension plans from being converted to annuities, something that currently locks in losses and results in workers getting less money

  • Require companies to report the funding status of their pension plans more clearly


  • Supports like paid sick leave and prescription drug coverage

  • Put people to work building up our communities with energy-efficient retrofits and affordable homes

  • Help Canadian workers make more products here at home

  • Create a low income supplement so that no one who is relying on EI regular or special benefits to stay afloat receives less than $2,000 a month.

  • Make EI available to people who quit their jobs to go back to school, to provide necessary childcare, or to protect their health or the health of immunocompromised family members.

  • Extend sickness benefits from 15 to 50 weeks, and create a pilot project to allow workers with episodic illnesses and disabilities to access EI sickness benefits a day at a time, as they need them

  • Bring back the former Extra Five Weeks pilot project and make it permanent, and restore the economic regions in the territories and PEI to their 2014 boundaries.

  • Bring in a new special leave that allows parents to take shorter parental leave at a higher replacement rate

  • Allow self-employed workers to opt-into parental benefits at any time before taking the leave, and move to double leave for parents of multiples.

  • Protect the EI Operating Account in law, so that future governments can’t raid it for general revenue. Premiums, which are currently at a historic low, will be frozen until the economy recovers.

  • Build towards a guaranteed livable income for all Canadians.

  • Lift every senior and person living with a disability out of poverty, and build from there until every Canadian can count on a basic livable income when they need it,

  • Expand all income security programs to ensure everyone in Canada has access to a guaranteed livable basic income.

  • Affordable child care you need, when you need it, with a licensed provider making a fair wage

  • Work with the provinces to build a universal, $10 a day childcare system that’s there for all parents, no matter where you live

  • Defend the Rand formula, so that unions can effectively advocate for workers, and continue to oppose heavy-handed legislation that suspends the rights to bargain and to strike.

  • Make sure that workers and employers can take action together to improve health and safety, eliminating unsafe working conditions and ensuring that whistleblowers are protected.

  • Update the Canada Labour Code to enhance safeguards for workers so that everyone can stay safe and healthy at work

  • Update federal standards and bring in a permanent safety net of paid sick leave across the country

  • Allow sick leave to be taken by workers one or two days at a time, give full income replacement to workers who are sick, and reimburse employers instead of putting the onus on workers to apply for the program

  • Move immediately to legislate 10 paid sick days in the Canada Labour Code for federally regulated workplaces.

  • Prioritize anti-scab legislation that will ban the use of replacement workers in labour disputes – for good.

  • Put in place a living federal minimum wage starting at $15 an hour and rising to $20 an hour, indexed to the cost of living.

  • Put in place rules to require that part-time and contract workers be compensated equally to full-time workers.

  • Immediately ban unpaid internships outside of education programs.

  • Replace the failed Phoenix pay system

  • Work to reduce the inefficient and costly practice of contracting out government work

  • Work with the provinces to ensure that Canadians have access to education throughout their professional lives, including proactive training and retraining, as well as support when they are unemployed.

  • Change EI rules to allow workers who quit their job to go to school to qualify for EI benefits

  • Expand options for workers in designated sectors and regions to take EI funded training in advance of losing a job

  • Require large employers to spend at least 1 percent of payroll on training for their employees annually.

  • Expand training options beyond people who qualify for EI

  • Make sure that small businesses wage and rent subsidies continue until small businesses are able to fully reopen.

  • Put in place a long-term hiring bonus to pay the employer portion of EI and CPP for new or rehired staff.

  • Put an end to gouging by capping high credit card merchant fees at a maximum of 1%.

  • Streamline access to government export services and make it simpler to break into foreign markets

  • Provide small- and medium-sized businesses with a single point of contact to help ease regulatory processes and support compliance

  • Make important new investments in training Canadians and boost support to traditionally underemployed groups

  • Defend Canadian workers in trade negotiations, protect supply management, stand up against unfair tariffs.

  • Improve the transparency of trade negotiations, so that Canadians can clearly understand the costs and benefits of any proposed agreement and have their say before it’s signed.

  • Protect Canadians against measures that could increase the cost of pharmaceuticals, weaken our cultural protections, or undermine privacy rights

  • Protect Canadian businesses who are taking action to transition to a low-carbon future with a border carbon adjustment that will level the playing field on imports from areas without a carbon price

  • Defend Canadian workers and communities from unfair trading practices

  • Develop comprehensive industrial strategies to incubate and expand critical domestic manufacturing capacity and supply chain infrastructure

  • Scrap the failed Invest in Canada agency and create iCanada, a one-stop shop inside the federal government to help attract investors to Canada and turn their plans into reality,

  • Convene an auto summit with provincial, municipal, industry and labour leaders to develop a consensus on a National Automotive Strategy to attract and retain jobs and investment.

  • Make sure that Canadian product lines and manufacturing processes are adapted to meet changing consumer needs and evolving realities in the manufacturing industry

  • Restore the Automotive Innovation Fund and make contributions to automakers tax-free to help secure next generation production capacity.

  • Drive demand by ensuring that federal incentives for zero-emissions automobiles prioritize made-in-Canada vehicles.

  • Develop a national industrial strategy to build an advanced low carbon manufacturing economy in Canada that will provide good middle-class jobs to Canadian workers

  • Grow the domestic market for Canadian manufactured goods, and provide strategic supports to our long-neglected steel and aluminum industries to attract and retain jobs and investments in communities across the country

  • Adopt measures to stabilize the Canadian steel market, and protect the sector from predatory practices of foreign producers who are shut out of other markets.

  • Require the use of Canadian-made steel and aluminum for infrastructure projects across the country,

  • Foster entrepreneurship, including through dedicated support to get the hard-hit tourism sector back on its feet.

  • Help launch a Canadian start-up culture, with a focus on helping Canadian companies in all regions of the country commercialize new technologies and scaleup, train and retain the highly-skilled Canadian workforce needed to support industry growth

  • Plan for a Canadian Food Strategy that will take a whole-of-government approach to address regional needs and priorities by investing in our agricultural communities, supporting young and new farmers and taking steps to ensure that rural livelihoods are good and sustainable.

  • Fully protect supply management and ensure reciprocity in all trade negotiations, and support our supply managed sectors as they innovate and grow.

  • Make sure that high-speed broadband and cell phone infrastructure is available to connect our farmers and rural communities to the services and tools they need, no matter where in the country they are.

  • Introduce a payment protection program for produce growers and take immediate steps to restore protection for growers selling to the United States under the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act.,

  • Invest in forestry innovation and support value-added Canadian wood products,

  • Fully implement the recommendations of the Cohen Commission and work with the province of British Columbia and First Nations to support the transition to land-based closed-containment systems

  • Ensure that resource allocations in the fishery are guided by the principles of adjacency, historic dependence and sustainability, while also respecting Indigenous rights.

  • Invest in habitat restoration and the rebuilding of fish stocks, as well as in strengthening our response to oil spills and derelict vessels to better protect our coasts

  • Raise revenues through new, fair and progressive taxation sources

  • Introduce a temporary COVID-19 excess profit tax that puts an additional 15% tax on large corporate windfall profits during the pandemic/

  • Increase the capital gains inclusion rate to 75 percent

  • Boost the top marginal tax rate two points, put in place a luxury goods tax on things like yachts and private jets, and ask the very richest multi-millionaires to pay a bit more towards our shared services with a wealth tax

  • Roll back corporate income tax cuts by three percentage points to 2010 levels

  • Ensure that internet giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon pay their fair share of taxes

  • Close loopholes that include eliminating bearer shares, compelling companies to prove the economic reason for their offshore transactions, and improving transparency on the taxes paid by large corporations

  • Boost compliance funding to Canada Revenue Agency’s enforcement section dealing with international and corporate taxation, to ensure that companies can’t evade new measures


  • Suspend the ERCP, while ensuring that it can be reactivated depending on the intensity of future waves and that it remains in effect for carefully targeted sectors and job categories where recovery remains slow, such as the cultural sector or aerospace

  • Propose measures to encourage the work of seniors with their invaluable expertise, by allowing low-income seniors to work more without penalty and by involving Aboriginal nations, in addition to encouraging the settlement of newcomers and graduates in the regions.

  • Propose changes to business assistance programs to ensure the vitality of all our SME models.

  • Repatriate all powers in the area of culture and create a Quebec agency to replace the CRTC, because we do not entrust our culture to the neighbouring nation.

  • Tax the revenues of digital giants at a rate of 3%, as France already does.

  • Force the Web multinationals to negotiate with Quebec and Canadian content creators in order to establish a fair sharing of revenues.

  • Demand that the money collected in taxes from the digital giants be redirected to a fund dedicated to Quebec's arts and culture as well as to our media.

  • Put an end to tax avoidance by large corporations in tax havens

  • Create a special additional tax on large fortunes.

  • The Bloc Québécois will reintroduce a bill giving Quebec an automatic right of compensation with full restitution when Ottawa creates federal programs in Quebec's exclusive jurisdiction, or seeks to attach conditions to these transfers of money.

  • Pursue a policy of economic nationalism in a perspective of resilience and autonomy, in order to ensure the maintenance and development of our businesses.

  • Tighten controls on foreign investments to better protect the flagships of our economy from takeovers

  • Abandon the project to concentrate the supervision of the financial sector in Toronto, which is essential to maintaining Montreal's financial centre and preserving the head offices that depend on it

  • Develop a procurement policy that favours small and medium-sized businesses and takes into account the environmental impacts of government purchases

  • Developing an industrial strategy that favours a certain degree of self-sufficiency in essential and strategic areas.

  • Negotiate an exemption to the Buy America Act for Canadian companies in the field of green energy and low carbon technologies.

  • Stand up to the United States in any trade dispute involving our agriculture, softwood lumber, aluminum or any other undue burden on the Quebec economy

  • Reintroduce legislation to fully protect supply management in future free trade agreements.

  • Address the issue of increasing slaughter capacity, where market concentration and current policy loopholes result in endless animal trips, sometimes euthanasia, and food waste.

  • Recognize the multifunctionality of farmers in its financial support so as to recognize the contribution of small producers

  • Ensure that farmers and processors are fully compensated for the supply management loopholes in the free trade agreements with Europe, the Pacific Rim and North America.

  • Propose to encourage small Quebec distillers in all regions and their unique products, by reducing the excise tax on alcohol according to the volume of production of the companies, inspired by what Quebec offers to microbreweries.

  • Insist on substantial industrial spinoffs from military procurement; predictable and sustainable support for research and development to design and build tomorrow's fuel-efficient aircraft in Canada and to develop the aircraft recycling industry

  • Support for the 200 or so small and medium-sized aerospace companies to get through the current crisis in the aviation sector and to participate in development projects that will ensure the sector's long-term survival.

  • Plan to maximize the potential of Quebec's forests, with the goals and effects of local processing, the development of technological innovations and increased productivity in a context of labour shortage.

  • Reduce Quebec's vulnerability to trade treaties and decrease the pressure on the raw resource by increasing the diversity of jobs, particularly through processing and the creation of exportable green technologies.,

  • Finance a fund to support the transformation of Quebec aluminum in Quebec, in particular by reinvesting all the money collected in counter-tariffs in the free trade disputes with the United States in 2018-2019

  • The unconditional transfer to Quebec of all federal funds dedicated to infrastructure.

  • Support the Toronto-Quebec high frequency train via Trois-Rivières

  • Propose a plan to open up the regions, including support for a Quebec alternative to Air Canada outside the major centers, the obligation for Air Canada to offer acceptable services in the meantime, the upgrading of the rail network and the increase of VIA Rail services.

  • Demand that Ottawa finally move forward with the high frequency rail project

  • Decentralize the federal public service, which is largely concentrated in the Ottawa region, in order to create job centres in the regions.

  • Facilitate work in the regions through tax credits for graduates and immigrants who choose to settle outside the major centers.

  • Make the telework tax deduction introduced during the pandemic permanent.

  • Regionalize regional development programs by decentralizing Canada Economic Development and entrusting the funds to regional funds that will allow the regions to manage their priorities independently

  • Table a strategy to support local purchasing and local businesses, the face of our main streets and essential cogs in the regional economy.

  • Propose improved support for the digital transition of businesses, lower credit card fees for online transactions, and additional time to repay loans taken out during the pandemic without penalty.

  • A complete revision of the naval strategy in order to arrive at a new plan that will include Davie Shipyard as a partner commensurate with its production capacity.


  • Create a comprehensive and equitable Guaranteed Livable Income for every person in Canada

  • Apply a corporate tax on transnational e-commerce companies doing business in Canada by requiring the foreign vendor to register, collect and remit taxes where the product or service is consumed

  • Impose a financial transactions tax of 0.5 per cent in the finance sector as France has done since 2012

  • Increase the federal corporate tax rate from 15 to 21 per cent to bring it into line with the federal rate in the United States, our biggest trading partner.

  • Charge a five per cent surtax on commercial bank profits.

  • Work with our international partners to implement a global minimum tax

  • Prohibit Canadian businesses from deducting the cost of advertising on foreign-owned sites such as Google and Facebook which now account for 80 per cent of all spending on advertising Canada

  • Eliminate the 50 per cent corporate meals and entertainment expense deduction, which includes season tickets and private boxes at sporting events.

  • Apply a one per cent tax on net (family) wealth above $20 million

  • Close stock options tax loopholes that benefit the wealthy

  • Close capital gains tax loopholes.

  • End offshore tax evasion by taxing funds hidden in offshore havens and requiring companies to prove that their foreign affiliates are actual functioning businesses for tax purposes

  • Focus the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) on identifying people who hide vast wealth, rather than conduct random audits of ordinary Canadians, as recommended by several Auditor Generals.

  • Provide adequate funding to the CRA to collect tax revenue hiding in offshore tax havens

  • Apply a tax on luxury goods, such as planes, and luxury cars

  • Create an “empty home” tax for foreign and corporate residential property owners who leave buildings and units vacant

  • Close tax haven loopholes that allow foreign investors to hide the names of beneficial owners of properties in Canada

  • Establish an arm’s length Federal Tax Commission to analyze the tax system for fairness and accessibility, based on the principle of progressive taxation

  • Eliminate all fossil fuel subsidies, including payments and tax write-offs, valued at several billion dollars annually

  • Ensure access to strong internet connection by investing in broadband connectivity

  • Invest in inter-municipal and rural public transit infrastructure such as buses and railway systems

  • Work with provinces to offer preferential tariffs for youth using public transit systems

  • Support the development of educational programs targeting sustainable degrees for rural/small-urban developments

  • Open the path for more apprentice programs and local post-secondary branches with online training for the time being and support towards the co-op model

  • Develop a new working model that will allow for more young people to work remotely from home if it is their preference

  • Help youth looking to move into rural areas have access to land, property for sustainable farming

  • Shift the direction of international trade away from “free trade” to “fair trade” in order to prioritize the protection of human rights, labour standards, cultural diversity, and ecosystems around the world.

  • Support global calls for the reform of the World Trade Organization to ensure more equitable international mechanisms that can effectively tackle the ongoing pandemic and climate crisis.

  • Strengthen the mandate and tools available to the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise (CORE) to independently investigate Canadian companies operating abroad and report publicly on its findings

  • Cease all federal support to Canadian exporters of arms and fossil fuels, with the exception of potential necessary sales of peacekeeping equipment in cooperation with the United Nations.

  • Develop and implement carbon border adjustments to ensure Canadian businesses do not face unfair competition from polluting jurisdictions

  • Lead international discussions to reform TRIPS (The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) to ensure that intellectual property rights are not barriers to the achievement and furtherance of international human rights and clean development.

  • Remove the current model of Investor State Dispute Settlement mechanisms (ISDS) in all existing trade agreements and prohibit its use in any new agreements.

  • Mandate and equip Canadian missions abroad to expand partnerships among civil society organizations centred on the promotion of human rights, resilience, scientific cooperation and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.


  • Counter anti-oil and anti-pipeline propaganda from radical environmentalists and foreign foundations.

  • Repeal Bill C-48

  • Repeal Bill C-69.

  • Approve pipelines projects using a streamlined process.

  • Find a private buyer for Trans Mountain.

  • Reassert federal jurisdiction over pipelines construction by invoking section 92(10) of our Constitution, whereby Parliament can declare any project to be for the general advantage of Canada.

  • Work with industry and with our American partners to possibly revive cancelled projects and keep Line 5 in operation.

  • Reassert the authority and leadership of the federal government on internal trade.

  • Use section 91(2) of the Constitution, which gives Ottawa exclusive power to regulate matters of international and interprovincial trade, to force provinces to apply the principle of mutual recognition where applicable.

  • Appoint a Minister of Internal Trade whose sole responsibility will be to conduct studies, raise public awareness, counteract the influence of special interests that benefit from interprovincial barriers, and put pressure on provincial governments to get rid of them.

  • Reduce the total amount of equalization payments to provinces, and make sure that only the provinces with the greatest needs benefit from it.

  • Establish a parliamentary committee to review and make recommendations on a new formula that will avoid the welfare trap and provide poorer provinces with the right incentives to adopt pro-growth economic policies and reduce their dependence on federal money.

  • Ensure that the new formula respects our Constitution, makes provincial governments more responsible for their policy decisions, and is fair for citizens of all provinces.

  • Eliminate all corporate subsidies and other inefficient government interventions (bailouts of failing companies, regional development grants, conditional loans and loan guarantees with an implicit subsidy, tax credits, etc.) that unfairly support some companies or business sectors. This will generate savings of between $5 billion and $10 billion a year.

  • Gradually reduce over the course of one mandate the corporate income tax rate from its current 15% down to 10%. When completed, this measure will make about $9.5 billion available to businesses, allowing them to increase salaries or invest in productivity improvements.

  • Over the course of one mandate, gradually abolish the personal capital gains tax by decreasing the inclusion rate from the current 50% down to 0%. When completed, this measure will put about $7 billion per year back into the pockets of Canadians.

  • Phase out all covid spending programs and reverse new spending programs announced by the Trudeau government.,

  • Get rid of the deficit by the end of a first mandate through fiscal prudence and spending cuts, including corporate welfare ($5B-$10B), foreign development aid ($5B), CBC ($1B), equalization payments, and funding for programs which are provincial or municipal responsibilities.

  • Eliminate targeted tax measures that are inefficient and serve no compelling public policy purpose.

  • Cut personal income taxes, corporate taxes, and the personal capital gains tax after the deficit has been eliminated, over the course of several budgets, as the fiscal room is found to allow it.

  • Phase out the supply management system over a number of years to allow farmers to adapt, and compensate them for the lost value of their quotas.

  • Create a free, open, and fair system that will save Canadians billions of dollars annually thanks to the lower prices they will pay for these products.

  • Allow Canada’s dairy, egg and poultry farmers to thrive and sell their products internationally.